Should the NBA lower its age limit? | The Tylt

Should the NBA lower its age limit?

Since 2006, players eligible for the NBA Draft have to be at least 19 years the same calendar year of the draft or one year removed from high school graduation. Many feel the age limit is unnecessary, prevents adults from starting their career and opens them up to getting injured in college. Still, the NBA has benefited from having players first develop at the college level. There's no need for the league to change the policy now. What do you think? ⚽

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Should the NBA lower its age limit?
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Should the NBA lower its age limit?
#NoMoreOneAndDone
#KeepOneAndDone
#NoMoreOneAndDone

The one-and-done experiment is over. It is a complete failure. Even Adam Silver knows it. He needs to do the right thing, and allow athletes to jump from high school to the NBA so they can immediately provide for their families.

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Rare is the athlete who comes right out of high school ready to play in the NBA. Most high school players don't have the physical or mental maturity to cope with the travel, and the demands of an NBA schedule. They need that one or even two years in college to get prepared for the league—whether they like it or not.

#NoMoreOneAndDone

For many NBA players, their athletic ability is their family's meal ticket. A lot of players don’t grow up as fortunate as others, and those families struggle to pay the bills. Being able to take care of their parents immediately after high school removes a huge burden for these players. If other high school graduates are offered that opportunity in other professions, why not NBA players?

#NoMoreOneAndDone

Detractors say these kids aren't mature enough to be on their own and the extra year in school helps. However, the NBA offers financial seminars to guide rookies through finances, and help players make right decisions with their money. 

These kids don't have an incentive to learn in college when they already know they’re going into the NBA. Not delaying the inevitable move to the pros could help teenagers more than one pointless year in college can.

#NoMoreOneAndDone

Despite getting force-fed talent, the NCAA is not really benefitting from the one-and-done rule. Basketball programs get cocky players who don't see the benefit of risking their bodies when the NBA Draft is just a year away. The on-court product gets worse, and the rule that was supposed to invigorate the NCAA is doing little than showing bad basketball. 

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For every LeBron James or Kobe Bryant, there are a dozen more players like Robert Swift or Jonathon Bender. The shining examples of prep-to-pro stars are built on a graveyard of busts who were unprepared for the league. A year in college to build that work ethic certainly couldn’t hurt NBA prospects who want to jump to the professional level. Going to college gives players a head start in developing their game for the NBA.

#KeepOneAndDone

The one-and-done rule is also there to save teams from themselves. Organizations gambled millions of dollars on "can't miss" high school stars, all of them pegged to be the next Moses Malone or Kevin Garnett. But what they often got were franchise-wrecking busts, sending ticket sales into the dumps and making teams uncompetitive for years. An extra year gives scouts more time to assess whether players are worthy of an NBA jersey. 

#KeepOneAndDone

Not only do the players develop in college, NCAA basketball gets a boost from having the best talent rise through the ranks. Even if they were only around for just a year, Kevin Durant thrilled crowds in Texas, and Blake Griffin was showing his explosiveness out in Oklahoma. That kind of once-in-a-generation play draws attention to the NCAA. College basketball is a beneficiary of the one-and-done rule.

FINAL RESULTS
Sports
Should the NBA lower its age limit?
A festive crown for the winner
#NoMoreOneAndDone
#KeepOneAndDone