Is Carlos Beltran a first-ballot Hall of Famer?
via AP

Is Carlos Beltran a first-ballot Hall of Famer?

#FirstBallotBeltran
#PatienceForBeltran
Join the conversation and vote below

Señor Octubre is calling it a career. After winning a World Series with the Houston Astros, Carlos Beltran is retiring at age 40. Many feel his numbers warrant induction into the Baseball Hall of Fame on the first try. Others feel that he was a good player who might make it to Cooperstown, but not on the first ballot. What do you think? 

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Here is a run down of Carlos Beltran's career:

  • 20 years in MLB
  • Nine-time All-Star
  • Three-time Gold Glove winner
  • Two-time Silver Slugger winner
  • 1999 AL Rookie of the Year
  • 2013 Roberto Clemente Award
  • 2017 World Series champion

He's got the individual accolades, the longevity, and the championship to get him to the Hall of Fame immediately. Beltran is widely regarded as one of the greatest switch hitters in the history of the league, with only four players having more home runs as a switch hitter. His 435 home runs, 1,587 RBIs, and 312 stolen bases were already Hall of Fame-worthy, but his championship put him over the top. Beltran should be let in as soon as he is eligible.

No one is denying that Beltran has Hall of Fame-worthy numbers. However, the requirements for the Baseball Hall of Fame are extremely rigorous, and even the most talented players have been left out in the cold. 

Beltran has an uphill battle to make the Hall, and it's hard to see him getting let in on the first ballot. He and his fans will need to be patient. Here is Graham Womack of Sporting News with more:

Best case, Beltran could be the next Duke Snider, who rates fairly similarly by a number of different sabermetric measures: JAWS, with 57.2 for Beltran and 58.2 for Snider; Hall Rating, with 131 for Beltran and 130 for Snider; and WAR, with 70.1 for Beltran and 66.5 for Snider. Expect a lot to be made about the similarities between Beltran and Snider, particularly as Beltran becomes eligible for Cooperstown five or six years from now depending on how much longer he plays.
The thing to know about Snider is that the Duke was no easy selection for Cooperstown. Hampered by an injured knee in the second half of his career, the Brooklyn Dodgers great declined precipitously and finished well off the mark of contemporaries Willie Mays and Mickey Mantle. Snider debuted with just 17 percent of the BBWAA vote for Cooperstown in 1970 and needed 11 years on the writers’ ballot to achieve the necessary 75 percent. It’s a wonder he even made it in that amount of time.
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