Are white athletes supporting their Black colleagues enough? | The Tylt

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Are white athletes supporting their Black colleagues enough?
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With numerous Black athletes speaking out about police brutality, many colleagues are rushing to support them. Some of the support they are receiving is from their white counterparts; teammates that have done everything from using their platforms to donating to the cause. Others look at Drew Brees' comments even after his apology and believe there is a long way to go in thinking they are positively contributing enough. What do you think? ✊

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Are white athletes supporting their Black colleagues enough?
#GoodAllyWhiteAthletes
#DoMoreWhiteAthletes
#GoodAllyWhiteAthletes

Don't pay attention to the silence of Peyton Manning and Drew Brees' tone-deaf response to potential national anthem kneeling—there are plenty of allies in white athletes. These players interact with and are team up with each other on a daily basis for months at a time. It would be impossible for a majority of them not to understand their plight off of the field.

Just look at Aaron Rodgers defending Colin Kaepernick's protest during the national anthem. Here is Chris Long doing the same. Here is Steve Kerr educating people on the Black Wall Street Massacre. Here is Gregg Popovich calling out white privilege and demanding change.

Sports are a great unifier and many white athletes and coaches have taken that to heart. There is plenty of support from them for the movement.

Tylt sports editor Dan Tran sits down with The Ringer's Tyler Tynes to breakdown whether Black quarterbacks are treated fairly in the NFL.

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As much as there are prominent voices in support of Black athletes, there is plenty of evidence to suggest there isn't enough. Four years after Colin Kaepernick took a knee to protest police brutality, Drew Brees still didn't understand why he did it. Is he the exception or the norm?

Peyton Manning hasn't popped his head out in support of black players even though they helped him to a Hall of Fame career. Chris Long called out the silence of white players in the NFL. If he's doing that, there is no way they are doing enough to help fight inequality.

Like it or not, white voices and support help bring awareness and ultimately bring about change. Unfortunately, that change hasn't happened yet and it may be because there hasn't been enough support in the form of education, donation or protest from them. They need to be doing more to support the movement and their Black teammates who benefit from its success.

VOTE NOW
Sports
Are white athletes supporting their Black colleagues enough?
#GoodAllyWhiteAthletes
#GoodAllyWhiteAthletes
#DoMoreWhiteAthletes
#DoMoreWhiteAthletes