Is America ready for a woman president? | The Tylt

Is America ready for a woman president?

After Hillary Clinton's defeat in the 2016 election, many Americans felt they would never see a female president during their lifetime. Clinton, an immensely qualified politician, faced sexist attacks throughout the campaign. Yet, some argued her defeat had less to do with gender and more to do with her policies and history. With the 2020 election approaching, and several women running for the presidency, many are wondering if the time for a female president is here. What do you think?

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According to a recent Pew Research Center survey, fewer Americans believe a woman could win the presidency than before the 2016 election. 

Some 45% of Americans say that voters not being ready to elect a woman to higher office is a major barrier to female political leadership, up from 37% in 2014.
This change has come almost entirely among women. Now, 57% of women say this is a major reason why there are fewer women than men in high political offices; four years ago, about four-in-ten women (41%) said the same. Among men, the share citing voters not being ready to elect women to higher office as a major reason is virtually unchanged from four years ago (32% now and 31% in 2014).
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Page Gardner, president and founder of the Voter Participation Center, disagrees with this assessment. In an interview with Politico, Page notes that if only minority, female and young voters had cast ballots in the 2016 election, Hillary Clinton would have won handily. 

89 percent of African Americans, 66 percent of Latinos, 63 percent of unmarried women, 65 percent of Asian Americans and 55 percent of voters under age 29 cast ballots for Hillary Clinton.

With these segments of the electorate growing rapidly, they could soon make up the majority needed to send a woman to the White House. 

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Patti Solis Doyle, Democratic strategist and a campaign manager for Hillary Clinton in 2008, agrees with this assessment. Doyle told Politico while she believes sexism was not a non-issue in the 2016 election, it was not what cost Clinton the presidency. Doyle believes she was the wrong candidate for the moment. However, Clinton's near-success has made a presidential run far easier for women after her. 

Sexism costs every woman candidate votes. But Hillary Clinton did not lose the presidency in 2016 because she is a woman. She was the wrong candidate for the time. She personified the very institutions voters despised. Americans wanted more than change; they wanted disruption. Still, Clinton has certainly succeeded in making it easier for other women to run for office. When I managed her 2008 presidential run, I made the importance of electing a woman part of my pitch to activists, donors and supporters. “If not now, when? If not, Hillary, who?” At the time, no other woman had the political strength, the ability to raise money, the résumé or the name recognition. She was our only realistic hope.
Now, Senators Elizabeth Warren, Kamala Harris and Kirsten Gillibrand (among others) represent major states, serve on powerful committees and speak directly to massive networks of activists and donors. Sheryl Sandberg distinguished herself at Harvard, McKinsey and the Treasury Department before crushing it at Google and Facebook. A retired woman general or admiral would destroy Trump on foreign policy. A woman mayor, governor or university president not yet on our radar screen could surprise us all.
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There still exists a strong contingent of voters who do not want to see a woman in the Oval Office. Per the Independent

Around 60 per cent of Donald Trump voters said they did not hope to see a female US president in their lifetime, according to a new poll.
While 63 per cent of those who voted Republican in 2016 said they thought it was likely they would live to see a woman lead the country, only 40 per cent of them said they actually wanted this to happen.
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Some also worry a female president could cause the same extreme backlash faced after Barack Obama's presidency. 

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Sen. Kamala Harris is supremely confident a woman, specifically a woman of color, could take the White House. According to CNN, Harris, herself one of several women running for the office, said she believes the American people could very well elect a woman for president. 

In an appearance on "The View" Tuesday, Sen. Kamala Harris said the country is "absolutely" ready for a woman of color president. "I'm not saying that about myself," she added, "but I'm saying that about the capacity of the American public."
FINAL RESULTS
Politics
Is America ready for a woman president?
A festive crown for the winner
#ReadyForMadamPres
#NotReadyForMadamPres