Would you tell people not to vote for a family member? | The Tylt

Would you tell people not to vote for a family member?

Adam Laxalt, the Republican candidate for Nevada governor, is the latest candidate rejected by his family. Laxalt's family, who claim to be life-long Nevadans, wrote an op-ed for the Reno Gazette-Journal accusing the candidate of lying about his ties to the state and betraying his "own immigrant forebears." Laxalt joins Rep. Paul Gosar, a Republican from Arizona, whose family recorded a series of campaign ads for his Democratic opponent earlier this summer. Common wisdom has always said family comes before politics, but not for these families. What would you do?

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Would you tell people not to vote for a family member?
#PoliticsOverFamily
A festive crown for the winner
#FamilyOverPolitics
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Would you tell people not to vote for a family member?
#PoliticsOverFamily
#FamilyOverPolitics
#PoliticsOverFamily

A dozen of Adam Laxalt's family members, including an aunt and his cousins, signed on to the Reno Gazette-Journal op-ed.

Like most Nevadans, the idea of family is important to us, and we are proud of the history that our family has in our state. The first generation of Laxalts came to Nevada as immigrants 100 years ago, and their children went on to be parts of the Nevada community — as politicians and writers and teachers and in many other ways. Over the years, we’ve always supported our family, even when we haven’t always agreed with them or their politics. But as this Election Day nears, we feel compelled to speak publicly about why we believe that Adam Laxalt is the wrong choice for Nevada’s governorship.

In the piece, the Laxalts say they are concerned the candidate's values and lack of connection to the state should disqualify him from the governorship. Yet, while they say they are confident in their decision, they still regret having to turn against a member of their family. 

If he responds to this column at all, it will probably be to say that he hardly knows the people writing this column. And in many ways that would be true. We never had a chance to get to know him, really — he spent his life in Washington, D.C., while we lived in Northern Nevada and grew up in public schools and on public lands. He moved to Nevada in 2013 so that he could lean on the reputation of a family that he hardly knew while tapping into support by donors who had no interest in our state or its people.
It’s worth saying that this column isn’t about politics. We would be proud to have a Laxalt running for office on Nov. 6, regardless of whether they were Republican or Democrat or independent, so long as we believed that they would be good for Nevada. We’re writing because we care about Nevada and because we know the truth about this candidate. We think that you should, too.
#PoliticsOverFamily

The Laxalt family's op-ed comes just weeks after members of Rep. Paul Gosar's family filmed campaign ads for his opponent in Arizona. The Gosar family took pains to say they did not enjoy coming after their brother. Per The Guardian

In another ad, Joan Gosar says she is saddened but feels obliged to speak out.
“I think my brother has traded a lot of the values we had at our kitchen table,” she says.
The Gosar siblings fell out with their brother after he espoused rightwing conspiracy theories about George Soros, claiming the financier who backed Hillary Clinton over Trump betrayed his fellow Jews to the Nazis in the second world war.
When Paul Gosar backed the far-right marchers whose rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, in August 2017 resulted in the death of a counter-protester, his siblings wrote to an Arizona paper to say: “We are aghast that Paul has sunk so low.”
#FamilyOverPolitics

Gosar's mother told The New York Times she disagreed with the sibling's decision to speak out against Paul. She made a point to note, though, that they all still loved each other despite their politics. 

Reached at her home in Wyoming, Bernadette Gosar, the siblings’ 85-year-old mother, said that she was unaware of the videos until she was contacted by The New York Times. Once they were described to her in detail, she said she was “shocked” and “crushed.”
She said she had a “wonderful family” but that the Gosar children in the videos did not relate politically to Paul Gosar or herself. She said from what she knew about Dr. Brill, “He doesn’t have a chance.”
“I share the same philosophy and policies that Paul does,” she said. “He’s done a hell of a job for Arizona, and they love him.”
#FamilyOverPolitics

Gosar took to Twitter to push back against his sibling's ads. The candidate decried his family's choice to "put political ideology above family," before saying "Stalin will be proud." 

FINAL RESULTS
Politics
Would you tell people not to vote for a family member?
#PoliticsOverFamily
A festive crown for the winner
#FamilyOverPolitics