Should we be done with Omarosa now? | The Tylt

Should we be done with Omarosa now?

As the nation enters the second week of Omarosa Manigault Newman's full-tilt media blitz in support of her book "Unhinged," commentators are wondering whether it's time for us to move on. Manigault Newman has been teasing the existence of some 200 audio recordings from her time in the White House but refuses to hint at their content. She's already accused President Donald Trump of eating an entire piece of paper to hide confidential material in the Oval Office, what else could she possibly share? Is it time to move on?

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Should we be done with Omarosa now?
#NeverTooMuchOmarosa
A festive crown for the winner
#DoneWithOmarosa
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Should we be done with Omarosa now?
#NeverTooMuchOmarosa
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#DoneWithOmarosa

In an op-ed for The New York Times, columnist Bret Stephens vacillates between wanting to cover subjects with a little more substance than Manigault Newman's latest bombshell and not being able to look away from the former reality star.

We’re stuck living in a nightmare in which the president spends his time on Twitter saying terrible things about all sorts of people, including Omarosa. And while we used to think of her as a conniving celebrity-seeker who would scruple at nothing to get her way, we are prepared to forgive her. Because she is an eyewitness. A victim. A whistleblower. A weapon for our cause.
In a word: a Resister.
At some point in the future — give it a month or two — the Resistance will have to ask itself whether its interests were well-served by presenting, as a key witness for its side, perhaps the only person in the White House with less credibility than the president. The Resistance might also wonder whether the obsessive focus on which racial slur Trump might or might not have uttered many years ago matters to the average American. If “grab them by the p— didn’t sink Trump as a presidential candidate, why should “n—” sink him this time?
#NeverTooMuchOmarosa

Many people are still enjoying Omarosa's non-stop press tour. Astead Herndon, a national politics reporter with The New York Times, compared Omarosa's work ethic to fan fave Cardi B. 

#NeverTooMuchOmarosa

Writer Mikki Kendall can't get enough of Omarosa either.

#DoneWithOmarosa

Entertainment Weekly's review of Manigault Newman's book paints it as an unimpressive bit of gossip that should be excluded from our political discourse.

Omarosa Manigault Newman has a story to tell. It’s certainly not a wholly truthful one, nor — for those who’ve been paying attention — is it a particularly surprising one. But it’s the one we get: the one to take hold of a weekend news cycle, to force a reexamination of the president’s racist and dishonest tendencies, to have the nation on the edge of their seat as they ponder, What does she know?
...Above all else, Unhinged is a meta-commentary on the bleakness of our political culture. Trump’s former Director of Communications for the Office of Public Liaison has, admittedly, executed an impressive rollout — of a style and, yes, substance more newsworthy than the book’s contents.
#NeverTooMuchOmarosa

Columnist Michelle Goldberg points out while Manigault Newman may be shameless in her pursuit of fame and fortune, she's been able to corroborate most of her accusations in her book, which makes her worth listening to.  

I wouldn’t take most of the claims of “Unhinged” at face value. But we don’t have to, because Manigault Newman has receipts. When I got a prepublication copy of the book on Friday, I wasn’t sure what to think of the scene in which Trump’s chief of staff, John Kelly, fires her, making thuggish threats to destroy her reputation if she doesn’t go quietly. On Sunday, “Meet the Press” played her recording of the exchange, which unfolds exactly as she described.
Similarly, I didn’t quite trust her account of the post-firing phone call she received from Trump, in which the president expressed surprise and dismay that she has been let go. “No one even told me,” she quotes him saying, adding, “I don’t love you leaving at all.” But on Monday, the “Today” show played Manigault Newman’s recording of this exchange. And that $15,000-a-month contract? You can read it yourself in The Washington Post.
FINAL RESULTS
Politics
Should we be done with Omarosa now?
#NeverTooMuchOmarosa
A festive crown for the winner
#DoneWithOmarosa