Should Texas secede from the U.S.? | The Tylt

Should Texas secede from the U.S.?

There's a new independence movement brewing in Texas. Inspired by Brexit, Texan nationalist David Miller is organizing a movement for Texan independence. Critics of the idea point out the United States Constitution does not provide a way out. Several states tried and failed during the Civil War. Despite this, some Texans believe the state would be better off and that there's a peaceful way to get out of the Union. What do you think?

FINAL RESULTS
Politics
Should Texas secede from the U.S.?
#TexasFirst
A festive crown for the winner
#MaintainTheUnion
Dataviz
Real-time Voting
Should Texas secede from the U.S.?
#TexasFirst
#MaintainTheUnion
#TexasFirst

A growing number of Texans believe their state would be better off independent of the United States. There's a clear and growing divide in the country and Texas is no exception to that. In fact, independence movements are inseparable from Texas' DNA — the state began as an independent nation and later succeeded during the Civil War. Miller's group claims it has over 300,000 supporters of Texan independence.

Here's how an independent Texas nation could work according to Miller:

Miller makes his case in language inspired by liberation struggles around the globe, and he calls his plan “Texit”—recalling the latest model for secession. Brexiteers claimed that Britain needed the European Union less than the EU needed Britain. Miller argues that Texas sends the U.S. government more in taxes than it receives in federal funds. (To arrive at his numbers, he doesn’t count Social Security benefits, which are paid out handsomely to retirees along the Rio Grande.) Unfettered by federal taxes and regulation, Miller claims, household incomes would sextuple.
Texas’s GDP, according to the U.S. Department of Commerce, is about $1.7 trillion, which would make it the 10th largest economy in the world, ahead of both Canada and Australia. Miller told me the United States’ $714 billion in trade with Canada could serve as an example of how trade relations between Austin and Washington would work. He foresees not a war of secession but a conscious uncoupling followed by cordial relations, with a largely undefended border. The United States has “over a million legal crossings with Mexico and Canada every day,” Miller said, adding that Texas’s border with the United States could remain just as permeable.
#MaintainTheUnion

Secession is not as big a movement as people are making it out to be. Claiming 300,000 members is a drop in the bucket compared to the 29.7 million Americans living in the state right now. Independence wouldn't work for several reasons. There's no clear consensus in the state to begin with. Secondly, there's no legal path for states to secede from America. Doing so again would risk bloodshed at the level of the Civil War. 

Every schoolchild knows that (a) Texas was once an independent nation, (b) we’ve long swelled with Texas pride (“which encompasses everything from brisket to football to Willie Nelson,” as The Atlantic accurately notes), and (c) thus far, we’ve never been particularly interested in secession as anything more than that little loose tooth we play with occasionally. It’s not impossible to imagine things like the 2016 floor debate going differently at a future GOP convention—we do live in unpredictable times!—but for now, you can fill a few stadiums with people who like to fantasize about the idea of secession, but that still leaves a whopping 98.7 percent of the state full of people who are happy where they are.
FINAL RESULTS
Politics
Should Texas secede from the U.S.?
#TexasFirst
A festive crown for the winner
#MaintainTheUnion