Should the DNC have gotten rid of super delegates?

Should the DNC have gotten rid of super delegates?

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#DumpTheDelegates
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The Democratic National Committee voted to strip so-called "superdelegates" of their outsized influence in nominating party candidates. Superdelegates became a heated issue during the 2016 election when supporters of Sen. Bernie Sanders thought, erroneously, that superdelegates had thrown the nomination in Hillary Clinton's favor. Supporters of the superdelegate system say they help highlight minority voices within the party. Opponents feel they give party insiders too much power. What do you think?

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Politico explained the rule changes.

What Democrats did last week was to ensure that the roughly 800 “superdelegates”—members of the House and Senate, governors, national committee members, and “distinguished” party members—could not determine the identity of the party’s presidential nominee on the first ballot. Only if a candidate has a majority of all delegates would the votes of superdelegates be counted. Otherwise, superdelegates are barred from voting unless a second ballot is required, which has not happened in either party’s presidential balloting since 1952.
The idea is to prevent the party “insiders” from conspiring—presumably in a smoke-free room—to override the will of the primary and caucus voters. 

Supporters of the change say this is a huge step forward toward greater transparency and inclusiveness within the party. Per NPR:

The proposal had broad support among the top leaders of the DNC, including chairman Tom Perez and vice chair Michael Blake.
"Voters want us to be listening to them, and this is a way to show that we're listening, to show that we're understanding the changes that had to be made after 2016," Blake said Friday.
Rallying his party ahead of national elections in 2018 and 2020, Perez told the party members gathered in Chicago on Saturday, "Folks, what we all have in common is we're here to win elections."
Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, whose supporters pushed for reforms after the contentious 2016 primary, expressed approval of the vote. "Today's decision by the DNC is an important step forward in making the Democratic Party more open, democratic and responsive to the input of ordinary Americans," Sanders said in a statement. "This has been a long and arduous process, and I want to thank Tom Perez and all of those who made it happen."

While some party leaders celebrated the change, there was a small contingent of party insiders who felt the move is punitive to the most "faithful" members of the party. The most vocal opponent was former DNC Chairwoman Donna Brazile, who wrote an op-ed for USA Today.

I realize that many people have felt left out. Part of the reason is that they have not participated, worked and fought to the same degree as many other people. A political party isn’t like some sort of event planner that’s there to make sure you have a fun time installing the candidate of your choice. It’s an organization made up of flesh-and-blood people who have spilled endless blood, sweat and tears. Those people have literally devoted their lives to creating this organization to fulfill their dreams of the kind of country we’re going to be.
There is a reason they’re called the party “faithful.”
...And the superdelegates aren’t the infamous “smoke-filled room” full of “old white men” deciding the fate of everybody else. But let me tell you something — it was once close to being that. I know because I helped change it. As I said earlier this week, I’ve been those people outside, shouting at the gate. I was with Jesse Jackson in 1984: an outsider, a troublemaker and a believer in the Rainbow Coalition. We complained and we fought. And we worked like hell for years to get on the DNC in order to make it inclusive.
...“Now that POC, women, and LGBTQ+ leaders have a significant say in the nomination process suddenly the rules need to be changed, effectively eliminating their participation. Funny how that happens. Lucy moves the football again,” my dear friend and co-author Leah Daughtry tweeted this week. Amen.
All of the people lumped together as “superdelegates” have made the DNC an organization that everyone can be proud of. I invite people to become more involved with it — not to try to make others less involved.

Some party leaders also felt stripping superdelegates of their powers would negatively affect minority party members. Per Vox

Not everyone was pleased with the superdelegate change. As Politico notes, some longtime Democratic Party officials fiercely opposed the overhaul, saying it would disenfranchise party insiders. NBC News reports that black delegates of the older generation specifically worried it would negatively affect black and Latino party leaders.
“This vote to strip superdelegates, unpledged delegates, automatic delegates, whatever you want to call us of our voice on the first ballot is inconsistent with our charter,” former DNC Chairwoman Donna Brazile told Politico.

Party leaders came together to pass the measure in the hopes of creating greater party unity.

The bitter divide within the party over the changes came to an unexpected close when former DNC Chairman Don Fowler, who was adamantly against the changes and led the opposition, moved to vote by acclimation instead of a ballot vote.
"You always want unity. I still am much opposed to most of what's in that document, but more people than I wanted it," Fowler told CNN after the vote. "You've got the elections to take care of in two and half months, then the convention and all the 2020 cycle starts. That's just a whole different ballgame."
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