Should Stacey Abrams run for president in 2020? | The Tylt

Should Stacey Abrams run for president in 2020?

Since losing the Georgia governorship in a nail-biter of a race that prompted accusations of voter suppression, Democratic politician Stacey Abrams has been hounded about her next move. A gifted politician, Abrams was tapped to give the Democratic rebuttal to the State of the Union address, an honor seen as a huge stepping stone in a politician's career. Abrams' name has been suggested as both a presidential and vice presidential candidate. But should she wait?

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Abrams has been drawing comparisons to another upstart candidate who has been pulling focus in the race—Pete Buttigieg. Per the Washington Post

First, both are crazy-smart. She’s a Yale Law School grad, he’s a Harvard grad and Rhodes scholar. They don’t simply have credentials, however. They have nimble, curious minds and are voracious readers. That makes them interesting to listen to and makes them sound somehow different, more serious than traditional politicians who rely on buzzwords and catchphrases.
...[T]hey present progressive ideas as common sense solutions without inflammatory language and labels. They explain what voters need (e.g. Abrams on broadband and health care in rural areas, Buttigieg on economic development.) If Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) aims to define himself as a socialist, they embrace humane capitalism, and thereby don’t scare away more conservative voters.

Buttigieg is expected to announce his candidacy soon, why shouldn't Abrams?

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According to a profile in the Cut, Abrams has been planning out her political career since she was a student. Not only that, but Abrams sees is as her mission to bring together constituents. That kind of studiousness and care is a sharp contrast to President Trump and could make her a formidable adversary in the election.

As part of her decades-long project to assume high office, Abrams carefully studied the history of the Democratic Party in the South, and became convinced that Democrats have spent too much time focusing on middle-of-the-road or right-leaning voters at the expense of others. “When you go after someone who has a deep ideological belief set that is contradictory with your own, it’s conversion,” Abrams tells me while sitting in the book-lined living room of her townhouse in Atlanta’s Kirkwood neighborhood. “Conversion is hard. Conversion is miraculous. We have entire religions built around the idea of conversion. Politics is not a religion. Politics is about persuasion.”
Abrams believes that persuasion works best on those predisposed to share Democratic values, which doesn’t mean it’s easy. “Your untapped population is people of color,” Abrams told me in September 2016, eight months before announcing her candidacy for governor. Never having been asked to register, they don’t think they should, she says. “You have to go knock on their doors. Go to rural communities, to depressed communities, to communities where there is absolutely no trust in politics or in politicians. That is an expensive endeavor.”
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However, Abrams has pushed back gently against calls for her to run, pointing to other elections as more immediately important. According to Politico, she has emphasized the importance of focusing on taking back the Senate over her own potential presidential candidacy.

"Our collective responsibility is to make sure that — regardless of who the candidate is — that Democrats take the Senate," said Abrams, who was in Washington for a speech at an annual gala for EMILY's List, the group that promotes Democratic women who support abortion rights. "That is my commitment, whether I'm the candidate or not."
#DontRunYetStacey

Abrams has indicated her current timeline would put her at a 2028 run, with her having all the experience she believes she needs to run. Per the Root

In an onstage interview with PBS News Hour’s Yamiche Alcindor (h/t NBC News), Abrams said she kept a spreadsheet mapping out her career goals since she was a young woman.
“In the spreadsheet with all the jobs I wanted to do, 2028 would be the earliest I would be ready to stand for president because I would have done the work I thought necessary to be effective at that job,” Abrams said.
FINAL RESULTS
Politics
Should Stacey Abrams run for president in 2020?
A festive crown for the winner
#RunStaceyRun
#DontRunYetStacey