Should the U.S. withdraw from the Iran nuclear deal? | The Tylt

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Should the U.S. withdraw from the Iran nuclear deal?
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Time is running out for President Trump to make a final decision on whether or not the U.S. will withdraw from the Iran Nuclear Deal. After giving a speech at the U.N. that was deeply critical of the agreement, experts worry Trump will withdraw from the deal without considering the serious repercussions.

Zack Beauchamp outlines in Vox the potential outcomes that could come about if Trump chose to sabotage the Iran Nuclear Deal. Beauchamp believes the deal would only put the U.S. in a weaker position to monitor Iran's nuclear proliferation. Beauchamp also points out that, thus far, Iran has complied with the terms of the deal, so punishing a country for honoring their side of the deal would be unwise.

The president himself has not publicly offered a detailed policy case for decertification beyond general calls to renegotiate the deal’s terms, nor are there any reports of him doing so privately. Experts don’t see any signs that he’s particularly well-versed in the arguments.
Decertification does not formally end the Iran deal — but it creates serious threats to its continued existence... What’s certain is that decertification would create a crisis in US-Iranian relations, as it would be the first concrete step the Trump administration has taken towards attempting to renegotiate or cancel the nuclear agreement.
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But President Trump is not alone in his criticism of the Iran deal. When the agreement was first reached in 2015, Republicans tried to kill the deal, and 47 Republican senators actually sent a letter to Iranian leadership in an attempt to undercut Iran's negotiations with the Obama administration.

Since Trump took office, many conservatives have urged him to abandon the deal. Jonathan S. Tobin of the National Review encouraged the president to "ignore experts" and trust his "instincts" when it comes to foreign policy, arguing the Iran deal does nothing to actually prevent the possibility of a nuclear Iran.

Trump should ignore their arguments and those inside the administration who are echoing them. It’s wise to have some skepticism about experts’ opinions; their consensus can have little to do with achieving the goals they’re tasked with accomplishing. But the problem is not only that the deal was a bad one. It’s also that plenty of experts place more value on diplomacy per se — getting a piece of paper signed and then defending its value — than on the conviction that diplomacy will stop Iran from getting a bomb.
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