Should the U.S. withdraw from Afghanistan? | The Tylt

Should the U.S. withdraw from Afghanistan?

The U.S. is committing more troops to fight in Afghanistan. Generals say the best strategy the U.S. has is the one the country has been currently executing. America need to commit to it and see it through. But many Americans are tired of the 16 year war. They want to see American troops brought back home and a negotiated peace between the Afghan government and the Taliban. What do you think? 🤔

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Should the U.S. withdraw from Afghanistan?
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Should the U.S. withdraw from Afghanistan?
#BringTheTroopsHome
#FinishTheFightFirst
#BringTheTroopsHome

Critics say the U.S. is not going to win the war in Afghanistan. It's been there for 16 years now and at this rate, it will probably be there for another 16. The U.S. has spent roughly $4 trillion in Afghanistan and Iraq with little to show for it. The Afghan government only controls 57 percent of districts in the country, down from 72 percent last year. 

It's time the U.S. admits it has lost the war. Just the fact that the U.S. is still there makes the situation worse. The Taliban are framing Americans as foreign occupiers to recruit. It's working because it's true. U.S. tactics are turning more and more towards radicalization. Sending more troops isn't going to work. The U.S. had 100,000 soldiers in Afghanistan at one point, and it didn't work.

Donald Rumsfeld, then George W. Bush’s secretary of defense, famously asked after 9/11, “Are we creating more terrorists than we are killing?”
No one has ever answered that question, but the correct answer was and is “Yes,” especially after the invasion of Muslim soil in Iraq and the air wars against terrorists in Pakistan, Yemen, Somalia, Libya, and Syria that have now spanned three U.S. presidential administrations.

Instead of spending more lives on a lost cause, the U.S. should cut its losses and bring the troops home.

#FinishTheFightFirst

If the U.S. withdraws, it's unlikely the Afghan government will be able to withstand Taliban and ISIS offensives. The government is only in control of 57 percent of districts in Afghanistan. That number continues to drop as an emboldened Taliban chips away at government territory. 

There are no good options in Afghanistan. That's why the U.S. has been stuck there for 16 years. The only way forward is to stick to the plan, give it all the resources it needs, and play the long game. Once the Afghan government is stable, its army is effective and its economy is functional, all other things will come. The country has expansive mineral reserves, which can be an engine for recovery if the government can establish safety. 

If the U.S. were to withdraw now, it's likely that a repeat of Iraq will occur. Groups like the Taliban and ISIS will grow unchecked. An ineffective army and government will be unable to stand on its own. At best, it'd give ISIS and other groups like it a new home. At worst, it'd be a full on collapse of the state, which could drag other parts of the Middle East down with it. 

Already, countries like Russia and China are seeking to expand their influence in Afghanistan. Russia is making inroads with both the Taliban and the Afghan government. China has troops stationed in country in order to fight its own War on Terror and to lay the foundation to fill the void if the U.S. leaves. Afghanistan is just something the U.S. has to see through. 

FINAL RESULTS
Politics
Should the U.S. withdraw from Afghanistan?
A festive crown for the winner
#BringTheTroopsHome
#FinishTheFightFirst