Should the U.S. ban the use of cyanide traps? | The Tylt

Should the U.S. ban the use of cyanide traps?

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) is halting use of the M-44 cyanide trap in Idaho after teenager Canyon Mansfield was injured and his dog was killed after an accidental trap release. A USDA fact sheet says the M-44 is essential in protecting livestock and is the best option to control predators. Other traps cause animals to suffer for longer. Wildlife advocates say the traps are indiscriminate and should be banned. What do you think?

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Mansfield was sickened and his dog killed after the pair accidentally triggered the cyanide trap while walking near his home. 

Canyon Mansfield was walking with his Labrador named Casey on the ridge behind his Pocatello home last month when he saw a curious device that looked like a sprinkler, he told EastIdahoNews.com. He tapped it and the spring-loaded device sprayed an "orange gas everywhere."
The 14-year-old got sprayed around his face, and he wiped it off with snow. When he turned around, Casey appeared to be having a seizure, Mansfield said.

Wildlife advocates say the traps should be banned because they're indiscriminate and kill more than just predators. A similar incident happened in Utah in 2012, where a German Shepherd died after releasing a trap. A Sacramento Bee investigation says at least 3,400 animals have been unintentionally killed by the traps. 

"It's mind-boggling that these toxic devices are still being used," said Brooks Fahy, executive director of Predator Defense, an Oregon environmental group. "It's not: Will someone be killed? It's when. They are ticking time bombs and do not distinguish between species."

USDA Wildlife Services say the traps are the best option to control predators like coyotes. They say cyanide traps kill quickly and painlessly compared to other traps. The USDA has a responsibility to control predators in order to protect livestock as well as endangered animals.

An agency fact sheet says that employees place the devices strategically "to minimize the risk of attracting non-target animals." It also says that M-44s – unlike leg-hold traps – kill rapidly. "Unconsciousness, followed by death, is very quick, normally within one to five minutes after the device is triggered. Animals killed by sodium cyanide appear to show no overt signs of distress or pain."
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FINAL RESULTS
Politics
Should the U.S. ban the use of cyanide traps?
A festive crown for the winner
#BanCyanideTraps
#ProtectLivestock