Should the Endangered Species Act be rolled back? | The Tylt

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Should the Endangered Species Act be rolled back?
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Republicans see the Endangered Species Act as a draconian an ineffective regulation that is often used politically to stop development. It's a job killer. Professor of law Jonathan H. Adler attacks Newt Gingrich for supporting the Endangered Species Act, and in the process explains why Republicans want to roll back the law. 

The ESA has more than a few “flaws” — it is an utter failure on environmental and economic grounds. As I detail in the opening chapter of this book, the Act is failing to conserve threatened and endangered species, particularly on private land. In some cases, it is actually doing more harm than good, discouraging habitat conservation and corrupting environmental science (as I detailed in this recent testimony before Congress). And the claim that the Act “is an excellent example of the value of civility, consultation, and collaboration” is jut bizarre. How could anyone say that about a statute that encourages preemptive habitat destruction, tramples property rights, and discourages cooperation between property owners and conservationists? When Gingrich says he “worked . . . diligently” to “protect” the Act, he means that he prevented House Republicans from enacting reforms that would have protected private property rights and ameliorated the Act’s greatest flaw: The perverse incentives created by the imposition of land-use restrictions on private land. 
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Animal rights activists celebrate the Endangered Species Act as "one of the world’s most effective environmental laws." The biggest indicator of success is the fact that species on the list have not gone extinct. That's no small feat.  

Meanwhile, the vast majority of the plants and animals currently on the endangered species list are now stable and their populations are no longer in decline. "We view success as preventing a species from going extinct—to keep them from sliding further," Frazer says. "We've been very successful at that."
The article goes on to debunk several myths about the Endangered Species Act. One of the most important myths it tackles is the falsehood that the law is a job killer. It's not. It's a framework to find a middle ground between economic forces and the conservation. 
The ESA may require people or businesses to modify their behaviors in areas where threatened species live, but that "doesn't mean that the wheels are going to come off of that economic engine," Frazer says. "We have almost 1,500 species listed in this country and we have a very healthy economy. We have a growing population with the highest standard of living in the world. That's often lost. Instead, we hear about the potential for a species to shut down oil and gas development in that particular area."
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Should the Endangered Species Act be rolled back?
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