Should police officers be required to wear body cameras? | The Tylt

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Should police officers be required to wear body cameras?
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After bodycam footage emerged of a nurse being violently arrest, an increased number of people are calling for mandatory body cameras on all police officers. Supporters maintain that recording encounters between police officers and citizens greatly reduces violence and protects officers by providing them objective evidence of incidents. But critics argue that body cameras are costly and create privacy concerns for both officers and citizens. What do you think? 👮 📸

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There has been strong evidence that body cameras improve interactions between civilians and police officers. A year-long study in Orlando found use-of-force incidents dropped by 53 percent among officers wearing bodycams and civilian complaints also dropped 65 percent.

Many officers reported that the equipment changed citizen behavior and helped to de-escalate confrontations between civilians and police. They also said body cameras improved evidence collection, and helped them more accurately recollect events and fill out reports. 
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Others have argued body cameras do not solve the problem. The officers in the Minneapolis police shooting who shot and killed Justine Damond, an unarmed Australian woman, had body cameras but did not turn them on. And even in cases where there is video evidence, it hasn't proven to be effective in leading to convictions or addressing the larger, systemic issue of police violence.

Video can only do so much. There are simply much bigger systemic problems facing police than whether there’s enough evidence to convict them in the courtroom or hold them accountable in the public eye.
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But family members of victims of police violence still advocate for body cameras. After the police officer who shot Micheal Brown—an unarmed teenager in Ferguson, Missouri—was not charge with any crime, Brown's family made a statement affirming their commitment to fight for body cameras on police officers. 

We are profoundly disappointed that the killer of our child will not face the consequence of his actions. While we understand that many others share our pain, we ask that you channel your frustration in ways that will make a positive change. We need to work together to fix the system that allowed this to happen.
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Still, many argue that body cameras are a fundamental invasion of privacy for both police officers and the public.

Unlike dashcams, bodycams, which are attached to an officer’s uniform or purpose-built glasses, can go into homes and hotel rooms. Unlike dashcams, their default view during an arrest, or during a simple conversation with a victim or witness or informant, is an intimate close-up. Many people think of body cameras as a tool for police accountability, but the primary subject of their surveillance isn’t the police — it’s the public.
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And some believe body cameras send a damaging message to police officers—that they cannot and should not be trusted.

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But many still argue body cameras are the best way to hold police officers accountable for their actions.

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FINAL RESULTS
Politics
Should police officers be required to wear body cameras?
A festive crown for the winner
#BodyCamsForCops
#NoMoreSurveillance