Would you support a candidate who is accused of sexual misconduct? | The Tylt

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Would you support a candidate who is accused of sexual misconduct?
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A survey from the Public Religion Research Institute of potential voters was released shortly before the 2018 primary elections. According to NBC News, pollsters found roughly 60 percents of voters would not support a candidate who had been accused "of sexual harassment by multiple people." 

However, researchers found the results varied wildly depending on the respondent's political affiliation. 

More than half — 56 percent — of Republicans overall, and 61 percent of Republican men, said they would still consider voting for an accused candidate, the poll found.
...But it also can’t be dismissed that Republicans are led by a president who has been accused of misconduct by more than 20 women — charges he categorically denies — and who was caught on tape graphically describing unwanted groping of women. While 70 percent of voters in 2016 said that they were bothered by Trump’s overall treatment of women, he won the election. And Trump has also continued to defend allies accused of sexual wrongdoing, including former FOX News host Bill O’Reilly and Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore.
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The Washington Post reports these poll results can be backed up by anecdotal evidence. In the midterm election, candidate Roy Moore was accused of sexually assaulting several teen girls. Moore lost the election but still garnered a non-negligible number of votes. 

It’s unclear to what extent these allegations of sexual misconduct will sway public opinion in Tuesday’s races, but anecdotal and polling evidence has shown that partisan loyalty, particularly among Republicans, can lead voters to question or brush off allegations of sexual harassment or assault. A survey earlier this year from the Public Religion Research Institute found that 58 percent of Americans who disagree that sexual harassment claims are “just a misunderstanding” said vote Democratic, while 38 percent vote Republican.
Kelly Dittmar, a scholar at the Center for American Women and Politics at Rutgers University, wrote in the nonpartisan blog Gender Watch that “voters’ intolerance for misogynist behavior and beliefs is far from universal.” For example, Dittmar wrote, while Roy Moore lost his Senate race after being accused of misconduct with teenage girls, he still garnered 650,000 votes. President Trump was elected despite accusations of sexual misconduct from more than a dozen women.
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Democrats have shown much more likely to turn against politicians after allegations of sexual misconduct. Per Vox:

When Sen. Al Franken faced multiple allegations of sexual misconduct in December 2017, Democrats forced him to resign. In the Alabama Senate election that same month, the overwhelming majority of Republican voters backed Roy Moore despite multiple well-documented allegations of the candidate preying on underage girls (also, Donald Trump is president).
What’s going here is a classic divide over social change. The Democratic Party, in keeping with its social credo, has fully embraced the #MeToo movement: both its leaders and rank-and-file members committing to the idea that sexual assault is underreported and that victims deserve to be heard.
Republican leaders and voters, including accused sexual assault perpetrator Donald Trump, have openly worried that the movement is going too far — that false accusations are running rampant and men shouldn’t be punished in the way they have been since the Harvey Weinstein allegations broke. “It’s a very scary time for young men in America,” as Trump put it in comments to press on Tuesday.
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After the hearings of Brett Kavanaugh and Christine Blasey Ford, many politicians and advocates called for the public to take allegations of sexual misconduct with more sincerity. Some, including Debra Katz, Blasey Ford's attorney, believe that dismissing women's claims based on the fact they cannot meet an incredibly high evidential threshold is wrong and dangerous. Per NPR

"These talking points are being used to discredit women and to weaponize this issue of sexual harassment and sexual assault just simply for partisan gain," says Katz. "The president [is] deliberately muddying the facts to confuse people about what sexual harassment and sexual assault are by blaming victims, and in that way giving people a pass for engaging in the behavior," she says. "And it's dangerous."
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Would you support a candidate who is accused of sexual misconduct?
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#InnocentUntilCharged
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