Should we get rid of the Sex Offender Registry? | The Tylt

Should we get rid of the Sex Offender Registry?

The Sex Offender Registry was originally created to keep us safe, but some have argued the registry is unfair, unjust and unconstitutional. Requiring sex offenders to face additional punishment after they serve their time violates their right to due process and constitutes "double jeopardy." But others argue sex offenders forfeited their right to fully participate in society when they chose to break the law, and the registry keeps communities safe. What do you think?

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The Sex Offender Registry and Notification Act (SORNA) was passed to protect communities from convicted sex offenders, but some critics believe it is time to abolish the controversial registry. 

Jesse Kelley of The Hill argues the Sex Offender Registry is "unconstitutional and due for a full repeal." Why are sex offenders required to face additional punishment after they have already served their time? We don't we have a domestic abuser registry, or even a murderer registry, why the extra discipline for sex offenders who may have committed much lesser crimes (like peeing in public).

Convicted sex-offenders almost exclusively face the vengeful, additional punishment of registration under the Sex Offender Registry and Notification Act (SORNA).
SORNA violates our nation’s founding documents by singling out a specific category of offenders for unfair, unconstitutional punishment. While the Department of Justice cites public safety as its rationale for continuing to enforce the overreaching requirements of SORNA, the program has metastasized, defacing some of our most treasured rights: the right to due process, the right to be free from double jeopardy and the right to avoid cruel and unusual punishment.
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But others argue the Sex Offender Registry keeps communities safe. Sex offenders pose a unique threat to society, and just because they're out of jail, doesn't mean they aren't still threatening. The process may not be perfect, but it seems like a small price to pay if it means protecting potential future victims of sexual abuse.

Is the registry process perfect? Probably not. There isn’t much in life that is perfect. But what do we do to protect our children?
The sex offender registry is an example of when rights collide; the right of the sex offender, the right of the victim and the right of society. So whose right takes precedent? Isn’t it our moral obligation to protect the most vulnerable members of our society? If we don’t, what does it say about us as a country?
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Many still believe the Sex Offender Registry is perfectly fair. If victims have to live every day with the consequences of what happened to them, so should abusers. 

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Others think the registry doesn't go far enough.

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But others point out many individuals end up on the Sex Offender Registry have been wrongly convicted or committed low-level crimes, like having consensual sex as a teenager or peeing in public.

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Even sex offenders are entitled to due process in a just society.

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Politics
Should we get rid of the Sex Offender Registry?
#RegistryIsUnfair
A festive crown for the winner
#WeNeedTheRegistry