Most influential president: Andrew Jackson or Richard Nixon? | The Tylt

Most influential president: Andrew Jackson or Richard Nixon?

Through war, diplomacy, successes and failures, the power of the presidency has been essential in shaping American history. Ahead of President's Day 2018, we're asking Tylters to decide which U.S. president made the biggest impact. Andrew Jackson is one of the most notorious presidents in our history, in part because he oversaw the Trail of Tears. But Richard Nixon was the only president to ever resign due to the Watergate scandal. Which president made the biggest impact? 🦅

FINAL RESULTS
Politics
Most influential president: Andrew Jackson or Richard Nixon?
A festive crown for the winner
#TeamJackson
#TeamNixon
Dataviz
Real-time Voting
Most influential president: Andrew Jackson or Richard Nixon?
#TeamJackson
#TeamNixon

The President of the United States is the most powerful political figure in America, and throughout history, presidents have shaped the very fabric of our nation. As we approach President's Day 2018, we are asking Tylters to tell us which president they believe had the biggest impact—positive or negative—on America.

Presidents have led us through global conflict, civil war, economic crises and cultural revolutions. From George Washington to Donald Trump, which president do you believe was the most influential?

Be sure to vote on our other President's Day matchups below!

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#TeamJackson

The 7th president of the United States, Andrew Jackson sought to be a direct representative of the common man and was the first president to actively campaign for office. Known for his hot temper and polarizing politics, Jackson remains one of America's most controversial presidents.

Before Jackson was elected president in 1828, he served in the House of Representatives and the Senate. He was then a major general in the War of 1812, where he defeated the British in New Orleans and became a national hero. Jackson's presidency is remembered for his conflict with the National Bank and the infamous "Trail of Tears" that resulted in the deaths of thousands after Jackson signed the Indian Removal Act which forced Native American tribes to relocate.

Jackson made a speech before Congress on Indian Removal, defending his decision:

It gives me pleasure to announce to Congress that the benevolent policy of the Government, steadily pursued for nearly thirty years, in relation to the removal of the Indians beyond the white settlements is approaching to a happy consummation.
The consequences of a speedy removal will be important to the United States, to individual States, and to the Indians themselves. The pecuniary advantages which it promises to the Government are the least of its recommendations. It puts an end to all possible danger of collision between the authorities of the General and State Governments on account of the Indians.

Jackson was also a supporter of slavery and was vehemently opposed to the rising abolitionist movement. He served two terms as president and died in 1845.

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#TeamNixon

The 37th president of the United States, Richard Nixon is the only president in our nation's history to resign before the end of his term as a result of the Watergate Scandal.

Before he became president in 1969, Nixon served in the House of Representatives, the Senate and as Eisenhower's Vice President. As president, Nixon was controversial, due in part to his bombing of Cambodia. Nixon eventually saw the end of the Vietnam War, repaired diplomatic relations with China and established the Environmental Protection Agency.

After being reelected in 1972, Nixon found his administration embattled over the Watergate scandal in which operatives broke into the offices of the Democratic National Committee. The scandal eventually led to the resignation of many top officials, and eventually, the president himself.

On his final day in office, Nixon gave a resignation speech:

When I first took the oath of office as President 51/2 years ago, I made this sacred commitment, to "consecrate my office, my energies, and all the wisdom I can summon to the cause of peace among nations."
I have done my very best in all the days since to be true to that pledge. As a result of these efforts, I am confident that the world is a safer place today, not only for the people of America but for the people of all nations, and that all of our children have a better chance than before of living in peace rather than dying in war.
This, more than anything, is what I hoped to achieve when I sought the Presidency. This, more than anything, is what I hope will be my legacy to you, to our country, as I leave the Presidency.

Nixon resigned on on August 8, 1974, only a few months into his second term, and was immediately pardoned of any wrongdoing in the Watergate scandal by his successor Gerald Ford.

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FINAL RESULTS
Politics
Most influential president: Andrew Jackson or Richard Nixon?
A festive crown for the winner
#TeamJackson
#TeamNixon