Was Trump's phone call with Ukraine an impeachable offense? | The Tylt

Was Trump's phone call with Ukraine an impeachable offense?

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has announced her intention to move forward with impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump. Lawmakers are in the beginning phases of investigating whether the president's phone call with the Ukrainian president—where Trump requested the Ukrainian president investigate Joe Biden's son's business dealings in the country—was an improper use of his presidential powers. The Trump White House has released an edited transcript of the call, saying it shows no wrongdoing. What do you think?

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Was Trump's phone call with Ukraine an impeachable offense?
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Was Trump's phone call with Ukraine an impeachable offense?
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A whistleblower within the White House—who has been identified as a CIA operative—submitted a complaint several weeks ago after hearing of the conversation President Trump had with Ukrainian president Volodymyr Zelensky. The Washington Post reports the whistleblower wrote in the complaint they were concerned by what they heard of the conversation.

“In the course of my official duties, I have received information from multiple U.S. government officials that the President of the United States is using the power of his office to solicit interference from a foreign country in the 2020 U.S. election,” the whistleblower wrote in the complaint dated Aug. 12. 
...“This interference includes, among other things, pressuring a foreign country to investigate one of the President’s main domestic political rivals. The President’s personal lawyer, Mr. Rudolph W. Giuliani, is a central figure in this effort. Attorney General [William P.] Barr appears to be involved as well,” the whistleblower wrote.
In that phone call, Trump pressed President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine to investigate Joe Biden, who is seeking the Democratic nomination to run against Trump in 2020, and Biden’s son Hunter. Trump offered to enlist Barr’s help in that effort while dangling a possible visit to the White House, according to a rough transcript of the call released by the White House on Wednesday.
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The White House released a rough transcript of the call. The president tweeted that the transcript showed nothing but a "very nice, no pressure, call."

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Lawfare explains there are numerous potential impeachable offenses included in Trump's phone call. 

As law professor Alan Rozenshtein put it earlier today: “The question is not whether Trump broke federal criminal law. The question is whether he has failed to uphold his constitutional duties and should be impeached and removed from office.”
In that regard, while the call provides no shortage of material to analyze, three main issues stand out regarding Trump’s conduct: the question of a possible quid pro quo; the clear evidence that the president solicited the Ukrainian president to deliver dirt on U.S. persons in a gross abuse of their civil liberties; and a just-as-clear attempt at soliciting foreign government intervention in a U.S. presidential campaign.

Some have been quick to point out, however, that President Trump never actually told President Zelensky he needed to investigate Biden and his son in order to receive financial aid from the U.S. Per the New York Times

At the time of this call, Mr. Trump was holding back hundreds of millions of dollars in military assistance to Ukraine that Congress had appropriated to help that country fend off Russian aggression. The reconstructed transcript does not directly refer to Mr. Trump’s freezing of the aid or whether he would unfreeze it. However, it says Mr. Trump referred to large-scale American assistance to Ukraine in the above passage...
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The writers at Lawfare dispute this claim, saying the implications of the conversation and what the president was asking were clear, even if they were not explicitly stated. 

Trump and his supporters have aggressively asserted that the call does not contain evidence of a quid pro quo. But in context of the broader issue of U.S. military aid to Ukraine, the memo actually is suggestive of a kind of shakedown. Days before the call, Trump ordered his acting chief of staff, Mick Mulvaney, to freeze a substantial package of military aid to Ukraine—a move that reportedly baffled and concerned officials in both the State and Defense Departments. Now consider how Trump sets the stage for his conversation with Zelensky by framing the U.S.-Ukrainian relationship in terms of reciprocity, suggesting that “the United States has been very good to Ukraine” but Ukraine may not have adequately reciprocated.
FINAL RESULTS
Politics
Was Trump's phone call with Ukraine an impeachable offense?
A festive crown for the winner
#UkraineCallWrong
#UkraineCallFine