Should it matter that the president misspells words? | The Tylt

Should it matter that the president misspells words?

From "covfefe" to "emergy," President Trump has a well-documented history of somewhat creative spellings. A prodigious user Twitter—Trump has claimed a supporter referred to him as the "Ernest Hemingway of 140 characters"—the president sometimes deletes and reposts tweets several times after making spelling errors. Twitter users drag the president every time he makes one of his textual mistakes, but some people say we're spending too much time focusing on insignificant errors. Are we worrying too much about the president's spelling?

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Should it matter that the president misspells words?
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#WatchHisLanguage
#MessageOverSpelling
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Should it matter that the president misspells words?
#WatchHisLanguage
#MessageOverSpelling
#WatchHisLanguage

The most recent dust-up between the president and the English language occurred when he sent out a tweet warning of a "National Emergy" brewing at the border. 

#WatchHisLanguage

The Independent has a play-by-play of one of Trump's many misspelling journeys. 

“Special Council is told to find crimes, wether crimes exist or not,” Mr Trump wrote on Twitter earlier this week to start off a posting in which he misspelled “counsel” three times and had five errors in the span of 280 characters.
As journalists and others poked fun at the mistakes, the President quickly deleted the tweet and posted an edited version. He successfully changed “wether” to “whether” and eliminated an inadvertent repeat of the word “the” – but he failed to correct the three inaccurate references to the title of his nemesis, Robert Mueller.
#WatchHisLanguage

Who among us could forget the thrilling six hours the nation watched and wondered what the president could possibly mean when he tweeted "covfefe." 

#MessageOverSpelling

Farhad Manjoo at The New York Times argues that Trump's issues with spelling are not actually that big of a deal. Not only is spelling no indication of intelligence, according to Manjoo, in the digital age, the ability to write without errors is no longer as important. 

[W]e should lay off everyone’s spelling. In a digital age of autocorrect and electronic publications that can be edited from afar, not to mention social media platforms that prize authenticity and immediacy over polish, misspelling has become a mostly forgivable mistake. You simply do not need to be able to spell as well as people once had to, because we now have tools that can catch and correct our errors — so it’s just not a big deal if, on your first draft, you write “heel” instead of “heal.”
Manjoo goes so far as to argue that misspelling is an important part of the fabric of Twitter. 
Twitter’s syntactic ugliness is a necessary side effect of its essential point, which is immediacy. Twitter’s appeal lies in its being a place to record one’s instant and primal observations on events happening around you — it’s something like the first draft of the world’s thoughts.
....If immediacy invites error, then error, on Twitter, conversely suggests humanity. One mistake many politicians and brands make when they get to Twitter is to compose tweets as if they are issuing news releases. They use complete sentences and big words, and the whole tone is off, like wearing a three-piece suit to a spring-break party.
I’m not suggesting Mr. Trump is misspelling on purpose (though I suspect we’re within a few years of politicians doing just that to sound more real). Still, his misspellings clearly add a sheen of authenticity. They offer an unvarnished, unfiltered view of his mind, partly because we know that he is posting himself — which we can tell because of all the errors, like the time he misspelled “hereby” as “hear by,” and then deleted it and misspelled it again as “hearby,” before finally getting it right on the third try.
With that in mind, who really cares how the president spells "emergency," especially when his message is stirring up potentially dangerous race-based panic. 
FINAL RESULTS
Politics
Should it matter that the president misspells words?
A festive crown for the winner
#WatchHisLanguage
#MessageOverSpelling