Who would you prefer as president: Donald Trump or Mike Pence?

Who would you prefer as president: Donald Trump or Mike Pence?

#OnlyTrumpCanMAGA
#PenceWouldBeBest
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With Michael Cohen implicating Donald Trump in felony campaign finance violations, impeachment has moved from fantasy to distinct possibility. If Trump is removed from office, he would be replaced by Vice President Mike Pence. Pence has shown more restraint, and possesses vastly more governmental experience, than Trump. But detractors worry Pence is more of an ideologue, more indebted to big corporations, and would pass much more hard-line legislation than Trump. Who would you rather have in the White House?

4 Mos Until Voting Ends
#OnlyTrumpCanMAGA
#PenceWouldBeBest

While much of the country's liberal population is clamoring for President Trump's impeachment, some are preaching caution considering who is waiting in the wings. Before running for president, Donald Trump was known for his somewhat malleable political positions, even self-identifying as a Democrat as recently as 2004

Pence, on the other hand, has made a name for himself as a hard-line Christian conservative and ally of the extremely libertarian Koch brothers. Per The New Yorker:

[I]n 2000 Pence echoed industry talking points in an essay that argued, “Smoking doesn’t kill. In fact, two out of every three smokers doesn’t die from a smoking-related illness.” A greater “scourge” than cigarettes, he argued, was “big government disguised as do-gooder, healthcare rhetoric.” 
...Even as Pence argued for less government interference in business, he pushed for policies that intruded on people’s private lives. In the early nineties, he joined the board of the Indiana Family Institute, a far-right group that supported the criminalization of abortion and campaigned against equal rights for homosexuals. And, while Pence ran the Indiana Policy Review Foundation, it published an essay arguing that unmarried women should be denied access to birth control. “What these people are really after is contraceptives,” Vi Simpson, the former Democratic minority leader of the Indiana State Senate, told me. In 2012, after serving twenty-eight years in the legislature, she ran for lieutenant governor on a ticket with the gubernatorial candidate John R. Gregg, who lost the election to Pence. Simpson believes that Pence wants to reverse women’s economic and political advances. “He’s on a mission,” she said.
...He backed “personhood” legislation that would ban it under all circumstances, including rape and incest, unless a woman’s life was at stake. He sponsored an unsuccessful amendment to the Affordable Care Act that would have made it legal for government-funded hospitals to turn away a dying woman who needed an abortion. (Later, as governor of Indiana, he signed a bill barring women from aborting a physically abnormal fetus; the bill also required fetal burial or cremation, including after a miscarriage. A federal judge recently found the law unconstitutional.)

Pence has shown an affinity for and ability to pass regressive, conservative legislation. 

Pence, though, has also shown that he can be swayed by public outcry. Per The Atlantic:

Then, in early 2015, Pence stumbled into a culture-war debacle that would come to define his governorship. At the urging of conservative-Christian leaders in Indiana, the GOP-controlled state legislature passed a bill that would have allowed religious business owners to deny services to gay customers in certain circumstances. Pence signed it into law in a closed-press ceremony at the statehouse, surrounded by nuns, monks, and right-wing lobbyists. A photo of the signing was released, and all hell broke loose. Corporate leaders threatened to stop adding jobs in Indiana, and national organizations began pulling scheduled conventions from the state. The NCAA, which is headquartered in Indianapolis, put out a statement suggesting that the law might imperil “future events.” The Indianapolis Star ran a rare front-page editorial under an all-caps headline: “FIX THIS NOW.”
...After seven chaotic days, Pence caved and signed a revised version of the religious-freedom bill."

While he did sign a law that many saw as deeply discriminatory, he was quickly swayed by public sentiment. He appears, at least, to listen to the will of his constituents, as long as they make their voices loud enough.

Some, including erstwhile Trump advisor Omarosa Manigault Newman, believe Pence is unstable and would be a far worse leader. On an episode of episode of "Celebrity Big Brother," Manigault Newman questioned Pence's religious fervor.

"I’m Christian. I love Jesus, but he thinks Jesus tells him to say things. And I’m like, ‘Jesus ain’t say that.’ He’s scary."

Yet, it is Pence's penchant for passing regressive legislation that would make him a better president than Donald Trump. Proponents of replacing Trump with Pence say that his legislative agenda and lack of charisma will make him far easier to block, as he will inevitably alienate many of Trump's supporters.

Without the constant crises and palace intrigues, a more low-key Pence White House would give the country a greater opportunity to focus on the issues rather than the man. Instead of giving attention to the latest outrageous tweet, the media might focus more on the administration’s disastrous policies, thereby making it easier to mobilize impacted constituencies.
And frankly, Pence just isn’t intelligent or charismatic enough to build a following beyond his narrow right wing base. At the time he was tapped as Trump’s running mate, polls showed him with only a 40 percent approval rate in solidly Republican Indiana and facing a tight re-election campaign, which surely says something about his failure to inspire his constituency.

Pence has shown, at the very least, an ability to comport himself with dignity.

Where Trump alienated allies and opened a dispute with the mayor of London, Pence vowed to “continue to stand with our allies” and praised “our cherished ally,” Britain. Where Trump has largely removed human rights from the agenda, Pence called for “an America standing tall in the world again for our values and our ideals.” Where Trump has stoked anti-Muslim sentiment, Pence asserted that under Trump, “America will continue to condemn persecution of any faith at any place at any time.”
Trump, at the National Prayer Breakfast earlier this year, told attendees to pray for Arnold Schwarzenegger and his “Apprentice” ratings. Pence aimed higher. “Don’t so much pray for a cause as for country,” he said, paraphrasing Abraham Lincoln. “Just pray for America.”
Amen.
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