Is America desensitized to mass shootings? | The Tylt

Is America desensitized to mass shootings?

12 people were shot and killed in a California bar, including the sheriff's deputy who arrived on the scene first. The deadly incident has left many people wondering if U.S. citizens are becoming desensitized to mass shootings. According to Vox, between December 12, 2012, when 20 children and six adults were shot in Sandy Hook, and August 26, 2018, over 1,800 mass shootings have occurred in the United States, yet nothing seems to change. Is there enough outrage?

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Is America desensitized to mass shootings?
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The morning after the shooting, Twitter was flooded with anger and frustration as many people tried to come to terms with the sheer number of mass shootings that occur in this country. 

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The president tweeted his thanks to law enforcement officers after the incident was over. 

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The president's 274 character message of gratitude was not enough for many people.

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Thoughts and prayers, long the response of politicians after tragedies like this, are no longer enough for many people. 

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To make the shooting in Thousand Oaks even more shocking, some of the people in the bar when the shooting began were survivors of the mass shooting in Las Vegas that occurred just over one year ago. 

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But many activists have been working tirelessly to ensure citizens don't become complacent. Student-led protest movements originating after the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School are continuing throughout the country. The weekend of the deadly shooting at the video game competition in Jacksonville, Florida, students led a 50-mile march ending at the Smith & Wesson headquarters in Massachusetts. Per The Boston Globe:

Dozens of adults, including some Democratic political candidates, participated in the rally, totaling more than 150 people.
On the final leg of the march, as they neared the Smith & Wesson headquarters, the protesters crowded the sidewalk, chanting “USA over NRA” and “Peace is possible.” One sign stated, “When I said I’d rather die than go to math class I was EXAGGERATING.”
“It feels incredibly empowering, because Massachusetts is a great example of why common-sense gun laws work,” Hogg said in an interview Sunday morning before the march began.
“This is not going to be a 50-mile march and we’re done,” said Vikiana Petit-Homme, a rising senior at Boston Latin Academy and the executive director of March for Our Lives Boston. “No matter how long 50 miles is, we’re prepared to fight this till the end.”
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Many voters though are fed up with the persistent carnage in the country and have pledged to become single-issue voters, only supporting candidates who make comprehensive gun control a major part of their platform. 

While these people are outraged, they are working to turn their outrage into tangible change. Eric Lutz wrote about this trend in a February 2018 piece for Mic. Lutz talks about Barack Obama's 2015 call for voters to focus their energies on gun control. 

“You have to make sure that anybody who you are voting for is on the right side of this issue,” Obama said. “And if they’re not, even if they’re great on other stuff, for a couple of election cycles you’ve got to vote against them, and let them know precisely why you’re voting against them. And you just have to, for a while, be a single-issue voter because that’s what is happening on the other side.”
In the wake of yet another mass shooting — this time at a high school in Florida — it’s worth asking: Should fed-up Americans follow Obama’s 2015 advice and become single-issue voters on gun control? And would such a move finally bring about change?
Kris Brown, copresident of the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, says yes to both questions.
“Voters need to make this their top-priority issue,” Brown told Mic by phone Thursday. “When they do that, we win.”
...The issue of gun control was one of the drivers of Democrat Ralph Northam’s win over Republican Ed Gillespie in Virginia’s gubernatorial race in November, according to exit polls — a sign, gun-control advocates told the Washington Post, that the push for commonsense gun reform is gaining momentum. They’ve also pointed to victories in New Jersey and Washington as evidence of a turning tide on the issue.
FINAL RESULTS
Politics
Is America desensitized to mass shootings?
A festive crown for the winner
#NotEnoughOutrage
#WeWontEverForget