Should working for the president prevent you from getting a job? | The Tylt

Should working for the president prevent you from getting a job?

It's not uncommon for White House officials to find jobs in the private sector after their time serving the president. Some join the ranks of business executives or contribute to national news stations, while others choose to continue their work in the government. The Trump administration has earned a reputation for its revolving door, and some of the many "former" officials find themselves out of luck when it comes to private-sector gigs. Often, shareholders will make their opinions known if a high-profile hire is one they disagree with. Should working for a president count against you, rather than in your favor?

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Should working for the president prevent you from getting a job?
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Should working for the president prevent you from getting a job?
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At the time of this writing, John Bolton, former national security advisor, is the latest to leave the Trump administration. Trump’s White House has experienced turnover unlike any other presidency; it is characterized by a revolving door of staff members of all kinds.

Despite the increase in “former” White House officials these days, eventually all White House staff must move on. If qualified staff members would like to rejoin the private sector, they should be able to. As the Atlantic’s Elaina Plott writes:

The career trajectory of a senior administration official who’s left government is typically filled with vaunted board seats and positions atop major corporations. 

The reality of the post-White House career proves that, in practice, former staffers, cabinet members and more, are not held liable for every policy their employing administration puts forward. 

Although Bolton has chosen to remain within the world of politics, he already has next steps prepared, per Axios.

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But some suffer more than others when it comes to finding employment after the White House. The Atlantic’s Plott continues, pointing out one official in particular who would undoubtedly face opposition to joining the ranks of any company or university: former United States secretary of homeland security, Kirstjen Nielsen.

As the face and name most prominently attached (besides Trump) to family separations, arguably this White House’s most unpopular policy, Nielsen won’t have an easy time finding her place in the job market, according to current and former administration aides, as well as Republican lobbyists and political operatives.
“Family separations make her completely and totally unhirable,” one former senior White House official told me. “I mean, major companies will face employee or shareholder protests over hiring any high-profile Trump person. But for someone who oversaw that debacle, holy crap—it’d be insane.”

Plott points out that as the person most closely associated with the Trump administration's family separation policy, Nielsen’s outside job prospects are practically nonexistent. 

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Whether it’s in the world of business or working for universities, former White House officials have a lot of expertise to offer. H.R. McMaster went on to become a lecturer and visiting fellow at Stanford after serving as Trump’s national security advisor.

Gary Cohn went on to advise a blockchain startup after resigning his position as director of the National Economic Council. According the the New York Post, Wells Fargo also offered Cohn a position as CEO.

And according to Business Insider's Bob Bryan, Robert Gibbs, once the Obama administration’s press secretary, went on to serve as the global chief communications officer at McDonalds.

Many generations of White House officials have furthered their contributions in the private sector after their time serving a president. 

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Nevertheless, the Trump administration continues to break the mold. Per Plott’s reporting, Trump staffers have a bit more reason to be nervous than their predecessors:

From almost the beginning of this administration, aides senior and junior alike have worried about their job prospects after they’ve finished working for Trump. Over the past two years, I’ve spoken with more than a dozen officials who have wondered whether a Fox News contributorship is their only private-sector bet.

Business Insider's Josh Barro refers to Annie Linskey at the Boston Globe on the subject. According to Barro and Linskey, being associated with a president and an administration's policies is seen as baggage by some private companies, rather than as valuable experience.

"Some wonder if White House experience is more of a ball and chain than a springboard," [Linskey] writes.
Some of the staffers Linskey spoke with cited companies' sensitivity about being associated with a controversial administration as a reason their job market outlook was poor.
FINAL RESULTS
Politics
Should working for the president prevent you from getting a job?
#NoFormerOfficials
A festive crown for the winner
#HireBasedOnMerit