Should former FBI Director James Comey be prosecuted? | The Tylt

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Should former FBI Director James Comey be prosecuted?
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In late August, the Office of the Inspector General published a report entitled "Report of the Investigation of Former Federal Bureau of Investigation Director James Comey's Disclosure of Sensitive Investigative Information and Handling of Certain Memoranda." The report features nearly 80 pages of information and materials, concluding that Comey "failed to live up to" the responsibility charged to every FBI employee: do not disclose sensitive information, as doing so has the potential to violate the civil liberties of "every individual who may fall within the scope of the FBI's investigative authorities." The authors of the report write: 

 By not safeguarding sensitive information obtained during the course of his FBI employment, and by using it to create public pressure for official action, Comey set a dangerous example for the over 35,000 current FBI employees—and the many thousands more former FBI employees—who similarly have access to or knowledge of non-public information. 
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Per CNBC, the IG's report finds that Comey kept internal FBI memos after being fired from the organization, used his personal scanner and private email to provide copies of memos to his attorneys after he was fired, kept four signed original memos and more. 

Many believe the revelations held in the IG's report should be enough to reconsider the idea of prosecuting Comey. As the report states: 

Comey had several other lawful options available to him to advocate for the appointment of a Special Counsel, which he told us was his goal in making the disclosure. What was not permitted was the unauthorized disclosure of sensitive investigative information, obtained during the course of FBI employment, in order to achieve a personally desired outcome. 
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In early August, the DOJ decided it would not prosecute Comey for his dissemination of memos. Per the Wall Street Journal, the memos in question detail Comey's encounters with President Trump and contain classified information. But according to Comey himself, the memos were personal documents. The Wall Street Journal's Byron Tau and Sadie Gurman refer to a person familiar with the matter for insight: 

The FBI’s determination that at least two of [the memos] contained classified information triggered an investigation by the Justice Department’s inspector general, Michael Horowitz, last year. Prosecutors have since determined the case did not warrant criminal charges, the person said.

According to Tau and Gurman, the DOJ's decision could follow the precedent:

The exact reason for the decision not to prosecute is unclear, but typically the Justice Department doesn’t bring such cases unless prosecutors can prove some intent to violate the laws governing the handling of classified information.

Although some choose to use the latest report on Comey's mishandling of information as confirmation for Trump's decision to fire him as FBI director, others point out Comey's firing and Trump's alleged crimes can coexist. 

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