Was it wrong for lawmakers to boycott the Trump inauguration? | The Tylt

Was it wrong for lawmakers to boycott the Trump inauguration?

At last count, nearly 70 Democratic lawmakers skipped Donald Trump's inauguration. Some cited the President's Twitter attack on civil rights icon Rep. John Lewis as their reason for not attending. Angry opponents say any boycott is unpatriotic and undermines the peaceful transfer of power democracy requires. Others argue there are serious questions about the legitimacy of Trump's election, and that protest in defense of American values is truly patriotic. What do you think? 🗽

FINAL RESULTS
Politics
Was it wrong for lawmakers to boycott the Trump inauguration?
A festive crown for the winner
#OpposeThisInaugural
#SupportTheTransition
Dataviz
Real-time Voting
Was it wrong for lawmakers to boycott the Trump inauguration?
#OpposeThisInaugural
#SupportTheTransition
#OpposeThisInaugural

Supporters of the inaugural boycott argue boycotters are legitimately protesting in defense of American values, and that skipping the inaugural isn't just sour grapes because their candidate didn't win. The Senate Intelligence Committee is investigating possible contacts between Russia and the Trump campaign as part of a broader investigation into Moscow's meddling in the 2016 presidential election. John Lewis cited Russian interference as his reason for not attending Trump's inaugural, the first one he has skipped in three decades: "I don't see this president-elect as a legitimate president."

Other Democratic lawmakers, such as California Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard, pointed to Trump's divisive campaign as their reason for not attending:

"I thought long and hard about attending the Inauguration because I value our democracy and respect the office of the presidency, regardless of party. However, the disparaging remarks the President-elect has made about many groups, including women, Mexicans, and Muslims, are deeply contrary to my values. As a result, I will not be attending the Inauguration."
imageSupportingMedia
#SupportTheTransition

Congressman Ben Sasse pleaded with John Lewis to attend. Supporting a peaceful transfer of power between leaders is a cornerstone of our democracy, and some say boycotters undermine democracy by not attending this inaugural. Did these lawmakers skip the festivities just because the candidate they supported didn't win? Because that's not how democracy works. Others critiqued boycotters in much harsher terms:

The truth hurts, liberals. Trump said nothing more than the truth, which is why he got elected. Any Congressman or woman who boycotts the election should automatically be disqualified for running for election again. Period.
imageSupportingMedia
#OpposeThisInaugural

Support for the boycott grew dramatically when Donald Trump attacked civil rights icon John Lewis in terms many called racist and degrading. Boycotters say skipping the inaugural is their way of demonstrating support for civil rights and opposing racism and bigotry.

#SupportTheTransition

Others are simply labeling the boycotters sore losers and disloyal. How many other members of Congress have attended inaugurations of candidates they didn't agree with? If Hillary Clinton can summon the energy to go, why can't they?

#OpposeThisInaugural

But supporters of the boycott say this election is different from any other that preceded it. Beyond the cloud cast by Russian interference in the election, they argue Trump's previous statements and campaign show disregard for the Constitution, freedom of the press, international agreements, and rule of law. For them, showing up to the inauguration is not supporting democracy—quite the opposite.

FINAL RESULTS
Politics
Was it wrong for lawmakers to boycott the Trump inauguration?
A festive crown for the winner
#OpposeThisInaugural
#SupportTheTransition