Was President Trump right to pull out of the Iran Nuclear Deal?
via AP

Was President Trump right to pull out of the Iran Nuclear Deal?

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After much anticipation, President Trump announced the United States would officially withdraw from the Iran Nuclear Deal, calling the agreement a "horrible one-sided deal that should have never, ever been made." Former President Barack Obama called Trump's decision "a serious mistake" and Hillary Clinton said "it makes America less safe and less trusted." But others believe Trump made the right decision. What do you think? 🇮🇷

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#IranDealWasVital
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President Trump announced the U.S. would officially withdraw from the Iran Nuclear Deal.

"It is clear to me that we cannot prevent an Iranian nuclear bomb under the decaying and rotten structure of the current agreement. The Iran deal is defective at its core... Therefore, I am announcing today that the United States will withdraw from the Iran nuclear deal."
"America will not be held hostage to nuclear blackmail. We will not allow American cities to be threatened with destruction. And we will not allow a regime that chants 'Death to America' to gain access to the most deadly weapons on Earth. Today’s action sends a critical message. The United States no longer makes empty threats. When I make promises, I keep them."

Former President Barack Obama thinks Trump's decision was a bad one. Pulling out of the Iran deal only makes it easier for Iran to get nuclear weapons. Obama and other experts argue the Iran Nuclear Deal was working. Why pull out of an agreement when Iran was holding up their side of the bargain?

The reality is clear. The JCPOA is working–that is a view shared by our European allies, independent experts, and the current U.S. Secretary of Defense. The JCPOA is in America’s interest–it has significantly rolled back Iran’s nuclear program. And the JCPOA is a model for what diplomacy can accomplish–its inspections and verification regime is precisely what the United States should be working to put in place with North Korea. 
That is why today’s announcement is so misguided. Walking away from the JCPOA turns our back on America’s closest allies, and an agreement that our country’s leading diplomats, scientists, and intelligence professionals negotiated. In a democracy, there will always be changes in policies and priorities from one Administration to the next. But the consistent flouting of agreements that our country is a party to risks eroding America’s credibility, and puts us at odds with the world’s major powers.

Hillary Clinton echoed Obama's sentiment, stating Trump's decision "makes America less safe and less trusted."

But not everyone thinks Trump made the wrong decision. Richard Goldberg, an analyst at the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies and longtime critic of the Iran Nuclear Deal, thinks Trump is doing the right thing. The Iran deal was weak, and Trump has left the door open to negotiate a better deal.

What we just did was give ourselves more options that are nonmilitary. Remember, the deal took all of our nonmilitary, economically coercive options off the table. Yesterday, we had no way of confronting Iran in the region, or confronting their missile program, or confronting their support of terrorism, short of military action.
Now we have all of our sanctions back. Now we can build maximum pressure that is nonmilitary and use our diplomatic tools to encourage negotiations to restart on our terms. That is giving us the best hope of solving this issue via nonmilitary means.
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