Would you support a Green New Deal? | The Tylt

Would you support a Green New Deal?

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez has made the implementation of a comprehensive solution to economic inequality and climate change the center of her legislative agenda. The plan, known as the "Green New Deal," boasts support from Bernie Sanders and most of the field of Democratic presidential candidates, and would see the government creating a wave of new jobs in green technology. Proponents of the Green New Deal say in order to save the planet, we need to drastically reframe our economy. Opponents worry about the cost. What do you think?

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The Atlantic describes the many goals of the Green New Deal in its current form.

The Green New Deal aspires to cut U.S. carbon emissions fast enough to reach the Paris Agreement’s most ambitious climate goal: preventing the world from warming no more than 2.7 degrees Fahrenheit by 2100. In a blockbuster report released in October, an international group of scientists said that meeting this goal could skirt the worst climate effects, such as massive floods, expansive droughts, and irreversible sea-level rise.
To actually make the target, though, the world must start reducing its carbon pollution immediately, and cut it in half by 2030. And we’re nowhere close. Global emissions levels just hit a record high, and even the Barack Obama administration’s most breakneck climate policy did not put the United States close to making its part of the goal.
The Green New Deal aims to get us there—and remake the country in the process. It promises to give every American a job in that new economy: installing solar panels, retrofitting coastal infrastructure, manufacturing electric vehicles. In the 1960s, the U.S. pointed the full power of its military-technological industry at going to the moon. Ocasio-Cortez wants to do the same thing, except to save the planet.
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Most of the current group of Democratic candidates for president have come out in support of the Green New Deal. Liberal candidate Elizabeth Warren has laid out a comprehensive plan for implementing and expanding the Green New Deal. Per NBC News

“I'm proud to support the #GreenNewDeal. I've also got plans to invest in clean energy tech and to stop drilling and promote renewables on public lands.”
Warren put out a $3 trillion plan to invest in clean energy manufacturing, research, and infrastructure and endorsed a plan by Washington Governor Jay Inslee to reach 100% carbon-neutral power within 10 years. She has also pledged to block fossil fuel drilling on public land via executive order.

Even more moderate candidates like Amy Klobuchar have been outspoken in their support.

"The people are on our side when it comes to climate change. Why? Because like you and I, they believe in science."
Klobuchar co-sponsored a Green New Deal resolution and has called for a goal of achieving net-zero emissions by 2050, but has not put out a detailed plan in comparison to some rivals.
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But the legislation faces huge hurdles, even before it reaches the floor of Congress for a vote. Per the Intercept:

Since the passage of the Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act in 1974 and the ensuing creation of the Congressional Budget Office, any given piece of legislation’s financial viability has been assessed mainly by one question: How much money will it add to the federal deficit? Nominally, the CBO provides an independent analysis of proposed legislation’s impact on federal spending and revenues. In effect, CBO analyses — or “scores” — can damn legislation to purgatory before it ever comes to a vote. Yet the sticker price of a policy is just one of many factors that contribute to its overall effect on the economy and society more broadly: Does it, for instance, meet a pressing public need? Will it increase or decrease inequality?
“If we had had CBO in 1935, we wouldn’t have Social Security. If we had it in 1964, we wouldn’t have Medicare,” [Bernie Sanders's former senior economist on the Senate Budget Committee, Stephanie] Kelton tells me. “It has become in many ways the key impediment to the progressive agenda and just good economic policy generally.” 
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According to GQ, some of the concern with a shift to green technology is it will effectively wipe out a certain segment of blue collar jobs.

Schemes to reduce reliance on fossil fuels inevitably imperil a certain set of jobs, which are backed by powerful labor unions that work to preserve their future. President Trump is physically unable to set foot in Pennsylvania without screaming about "clean coal," an oxymoronic rallying cry embraced by those who depend on the mining industry. By focusing throughout on the legislation's economic impact—and creating new jobs to replace the ones it may kill—the Green New Deal committee might be able to mitigate this concern.
FINAL RESULTS
Politics
Would you support a Green New Deal?
#NeedANewDeal
A festive crown for the winner
#NoNewDeal