Should doxing be illegal?
via AP

Should doxing be illegal?

#DoxingAlwaysWrong
#DicksDeserveDoxing
Join the conversation and vote below

After a Manhattan man was captured on video spewing bigoted insults at two women for speaking Spanish, Black Lives Matter activist Shaun King identified the man and posted a screenshot of his law website on social media, resulting in the man's name trending on TwitterCritics say nobodynot even racistsshould be the victim of mob justice or threaten having their private information shared. But if you're harassing others in public, don't you deserve to be shamed? What do you think?

13 days Until Voting Ends
#DoxingAlwaysWrong
#DicksDeserveDoxing

Doxing typically refers to revealing an individual's personal information such as their full name, address, workplace or phone number. Doxing has been used by activists to identify Nazis, but it has also been used by hackers to expose private information and destroy people's lives.

Online vigilantism has been around since the early days of the internet. So has “doxxing” — originally a slang term among hackers for obtaining and posting private documents about an individual, usually a rival or enemy. To hackers, who prized their anonymity, it was considered a cruel attack.
But doxxing has emerged from subculture websites like 4Chan and Reddit to become something of a mainstream phenomenon since a white supremacist march on Charlottesville, Va., earlier this month.

Many argue there is nothing wrong with identifying individuals and sharing information that can be easily found online, but sharing an individual's private documents is where we should draw the line.

Black Lives Matter activist Shaun King posted a video of a man in Manhattan spewing racist insults at two women for speaking Spanish. King called on his Twitter followers to help identify the man.

"Your clients and your staff are speaking Spanish to staff when they should be speaking English...My guess is they're undocumented, so my next call is to ICE to have each one of them taken out of my country. If they have the balls to come here and live off my money—I pay for their welfare. I pay for their ability to be here."

Eventually, King identified the man as Aaron Schlossberg and shared a screenshot of his workplace with his Twitter followers.

Aaron Schlossberg even began trending as people bashed him on social media.

The Internet spared Schlossberg no mercy—and why should it? Schlossberg is the one who chose to go on a racist tirade in public. It's 2018, shouldn't we assume everything is being recorded and photographed?

But others feeling doxing is always wrong, even if it's used against bad people. Nobody deserves to receive death threats or have their information shared online.

But Shaun King doesn't consider sharing public information about an individual to be doxing. Many define doxing as the sharing of privately held information—such as identifying documents—not information that can be found in a basic Google search.

Others feel mob justice of any kind is never the answer.

Some worry all the Internet shaming may backfire and actually elevate Schlossberg's profile.

But others insist doxing is a crucial tool for activists. Doxing was used to identify Nazis. If you are publicly displaying your bigotry, don't be shocked when someone holds you accountable for your actions.

Share

More from The Tylt

Should the U.S. tax junk food?
Should the U.S. tax junk food?
Politics
Who should liberals fear more: President Trump or a potential President Pence?
Who should liberals fear more: President Trump or a potential President Pence?
Politics
Does President Trump deserve the Nobel Peace Prize?
Does President Trump deserve the Nobel Peace Prize?
Politics