Does the U.S. need more oil pipelines? | The Tylt

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Does the U.S. need more oil pipelines?
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The oil industry is welcoming the executive orders. Pipelines allow oil producers to move oil more efficiently and will give new markets access to the North Dakotan and Canadian oil fields.

Dakota Access, likewise, is aimed at giving Bakken producers a new route to energy markets, allowing them to forgo more costly rail shipments that have been a backstop when existing pipes fill up. With a capacity of about 470,000 barrels a day, Dakota Access would ship about half of current Bakken crude production and enable producers to access Midwest and Gulf Coast markets.
President Trump's supporters see this move as another sign that he is truly committed to bringing good jobs back to the U.S.
“What we saw today was bold and decisive action by President Trump," Terry O’Sullivan, general president of LiUNA, said in a conference call with reporters. "He said he was going to create middle-class jobs, and by what he did today, that’s exactly what he’s going to do."
The move is alarming activists who fought tooth and nail to stop both the Keystone XL Pipeline and the Dakota Access Pipeline. Activists say Keystone XL must be stopped to prevent further development of the Alberta oil sands—the extraction process is extremely destructive and requires more energy. Water protectors say the Dakota Access Pipeline must be stopped to prevent contamination of the water supply for millions of people.
Environmentalists fiercely battled Keystone XL, making it a flashpoint in broader debates about U.S. energy policy and climate change. Landowners in the pipeline’s path have warned that a spill of dense crude could contaminate the Ogallala aquifer, a source of drinking water that stretches from Texas to South Dakota. And activists said it would promote further development of oil sands in Alberta, Canada that generally require more energy to extract.
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Post by Peter Welch.
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Post by Lou Comunale.
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We welcome President Trump’s approval of the Keystone XL pipeline. This is a win for both our countries’ energy industries, for energy consumers and for energy security.
I have said before that if Keystone had been judged on its merits and on the facts – it would have been approved years ago.
Our government has advocated strongly for Keystone. As the National Post’s Claudia Cattaneo succinctly put it in a column about Keystone, the pipeline “meets U.S. criteria, enhances U.S. energy security, feeds Canadian heavy oil to U.S. refineries that want it, is important to Canada’s economy, and is better for the environment than rail.”
For Canada, it means we can move our oil – safe, secure Canadian oil – to our biggest customer and to tidewater. It will help lower the price differential Canada receives for its oil – that differential costs our governments and producers hundreds of millions of dollars each year. It will also help free up capacity on our railways for moving other products.For Saskatchewan, there will be about 2,200 jobs building the 530 kilometers of Keystone XL in Alberta and Saskatchewan at a cost of approximately $1.2 billion. Keystone XL is projected to result in an additional $3.5 million in additional property tax revenues in Alberta per year and $1.3 million in Saskatchewan.This is also good news for Evraz in Regina. The company participated in the Keystone project up to the point that it was shut down by the Obama Administration and are optimistic their company will continue to be involved in the project now that it has been approved to go forward.
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