Do you support impeachment? | The Tylt

Do you support impeachment?

Democrats argue Trump abused his power as President and then obstructed Congress' investigation into that abuse of power. Trump coerced Ukranian president Volodymyr Zelensky into opening investigations that would benefit Trump politically. It's a clear abuse of power. Trump's flat out refusal to cooperate with Congress will set a dangerous precedent. Impeachment is necessary to defend the country from Trump's abuses of power. 

Republicans argue Democrats have a flimsy case with no real evidence. Trump denies he did anything for his personal gain. He asked a favor for "us," as in the United States. Republicans say what's really happening is Democrats decided on impeaching President Trump since his first day in office. Democrats are abusing the impeachment process for their own political gain. 

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The case for impeachment against Trump lies on two facts: Trump abused his powers and Trump obstructed Congress' investigation of that abuse. Trump abused his powers while dealing with Ukraine in two clear instances. First, he denied a meeting with the President of Ukraine—a high priority for Zelensky—until after the Ukrainians open investigations into disproven conspiracies. Trump then withheld military aid, again tying it to investigations involving Hunter Biden and other conspiracies

Some Republicans argue that since Mr. Trump released the aid, no harm was done. But U.S. officials testified that there has been extensive damage to U.S.-Ukrainian relations — to Russia’s benefit. Mr. Volker testified: “It’s a tragedy for the United States and for Ukraine that our efforts in this area, which were bearing fruit, have now been thrown into disarray.”

The second article of impeachment addresses Trump's obstruction of the impeachment efforts. Trump ordered Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney and other White House officials to not testify before Congress. This cuts to the very core of the system of checks and balances the Founding Fathers put in place. No president, including Trump, can undermine our system of governance. Congress' power to hold the executive branch accountable is essential to our government. 

The House Intelligence Committee’s report rightly warns that “this unprecedented campaign of obstruction” poses a serious threat to U.S. democracy. “The damage to our system of checks and balances . . . will be long-lasting and potentially irrevocable if the President’s ability to stonewall Congress goes unchecked.”
Congress prepared an article of impeachment against President Richard M. Nixon for a less comprehensive refusal to cooperate. Mr. Trump’s actions demand that Congress again act to protect a foundation of U.S. democracy.
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The core of the Republican case against impeachment is that Trump did nothing impeachable. He was not acting for his own personal benefit, he was asking for those investigations on behalf of the United States. Trump argues it's important to look into Hunter Biden and Crowdstrike — even though they have been repeatedly disproven as conspiracy theories. 

Here's how the Washington Post's Philp Bump characterizes the Republican case against impeachment. 

It's also the case that the allegation that Trump withheld the aid to compel Ukraine to launch the investigations is not well supported. The initial decision to hold the aid apparently followed the Defense Department's public announcement that it was coming. It is certainly consistent with Trump's established views to withhold aid for no reason other than that he opposes foreign aid. What's more, while the effort to leverage a meeting for the probes is clear, it's not clear that Trump insisted that aid additionally be used in that way. Trump's defenders further note that the aid was released without the investigations being launched.

Republicans have a simple argument against the charge of obstruction. Again, it boils down to: Trump didn't do anything impeachable. Here's how Bump puts it.

The central argument made here is a broad one: Trump's declination to participate in the process and, in part, to push the question of the scope of the House's power to the courts is not impeachable.
George Washington University professor Jonathan Turley summarized that case.
“If you impeach a president, if you make a high crime and misdemeanor out of going to the courts, it is an abuse of power. It’s your abuse of power,” he said. “You are doing precisely what you’re criticizing the president for doing."
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Do you support impeachment?
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