Are we desensitized to mass shootings?
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Are we desensitized to mass shootings?

#NotEnoughOutrage
#WeWontEverForget
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Three people are dead and 11 more were injured at a video gaming tournament in Jacksonville, Fla. after a participant opened fire with a handgun. The deadly incident has left many people wondering if United States citizens are becoming desensitized. According to Vox, between December 12, 2012, when 20 children and six adults were shot in Sandy Hook, and August 26, 2018, over 1,800 mass shootings occurred in the United States. Is there enough outrage?

THE VOTES ARE IN!
#NotEnoughOutrage
67.7%
#WeWontEverForget
32.3%

Some were quick to point out the president tweeted eight times the morning after the shooting and failed to mention the tragedy even once.

Unlike the president, many politicians made statements condemning the violence and calling for stricter gun control. The shooting in Jacksonville took place days before Florida holds its primary elections. While Republican candidates remained relatively "subdued" in their reactions, according to the Tallahassee Democrat, their Democratic counterparts were vocal in their calls for a change in the state's gun laws. 

Democrats running for governor quickly pointed out that Sunday’s shooting followed the Parkland massacre in February, the Fort Lauderdale airport killings in 2017 and the Pulse Nightclub shooting of 2016.
The four who died Sunday increased the body count to 75 Floridians killed in mass shootings in 26 months.
“No more. These are our kids. Our friends. Our neighbors,” said [Jeff] Greene.
“I’m tired of hearing ‘when is enough going to be enough?’ I am tired of hearing ‘thoughts and prayers’ from those who do nothing,” said [Gwen] Graham.
“We need to end these mass shootings – and the only way to do that is to vote out the politicians complicit in this cycle of death,” tweeted Graham, who has pledged to ban assault weapons with an executive order. The suspect is a Baltimore resident and used a handgun, authorities said.
The Florida Legislature toughened gun regulations in the wake of the February shooting at a Parkland high school. After the biggest protest rallies the capital city had seen in recent memory, lawmakers raised the minimum age to buy a gun, created a three-day waiting period for gun purchases and banned bump stocks.

Despite the horror many were expressing at yet another mass shooting incident in the United States, the story was buried by some of the nation's newspapers.

But many activists are working tirelessly to ensure citizens don't become complacent. Student-led protest movements originating after the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School are continuing throughout the country. The weekend of the deadly shooting at the video game competition, students led a 50-mile march ending at the Smith & Wesson headquarters in Massachusetts. Per The Boston Globe

Dozens of adults, including some Democratic political candidates, participated in the rally, totaling more than 150 people.
On the final leg of the march, as they neared the Smith & Wesson headquarters, the protesters crowded the sidewalk, chanting “USA over NRA” and “Peace is possible.” One sign stated, “When I said I’d rather die than go to math class I was EXAGGERATING.”
“It feels incredibly empowering, because Massachusetts is a great example of why common-sense gun laws work,” Hogg said in an interview Sunday morning before the march began.
“This is not going to be a 50-mile march and we’re done,” said Vikiana Petit-Homme, a rising senior at Boston Latin Academy and the executive director of March for Our Lives Boston. “No matter how long 50 miles is, we’re prepared to fight this till the end.”
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