Should candidates drop out if they didn't make the debate? | The Tylt

Should candidates drop out if they didn't make the debate?

Twelve Democratic candidates have qualified for October's round of debates, making it the largest single debate in history. Of the candidates participating, four have yet to meet the threshold DNC officials have set for November's debate, while seven candidates failed to meet October's threshold. Some of these candidates have claimed the DNC's rules are unfair. Additionally, it is not unusual for dark horse candidates to soar later in the campaign. However, missing the thresholds does indicate a lack of popularity among voters. Should these candidates drop out?

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Should candidates drop out if they didn't make the debate?
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Should candidates drop out if they didn't make the debate?
#DemsNeedToDropOut
#KeepDemsInRace
#DemsNeedToDropOut

As NPR explains, the debates are a critical stage for candidates to insert themselves into the national conversation and maintain relevance in a crowded field. Without that exposure, campaigns are much more likely to stall.

Debates are a place to boost a campaign with a big moment in front of a big TV audience. But this time, they are also practically functioning as gatekeepers in the process.
It's simple really, Anderson said: "If you do not make that DNC debate stage you are not a part of the national conversation anymore."
And if you're not part of the national conversation, the downward spiral takes hold. You can't rise in the polls, which makes it even harder to raise money, which means your campaign has no oxygen.
Game over.
#DemsNeedToDropOut

With the tumult and drama of Congress' impeachment inquiry, the debates are even more important to candidate relevancy. Per CNN

Increasingly, candidates are being crowded off the debate stage and out of the national news cycles. The House's move to begin impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump means there is less attention on the 2020 Democratic primary than many campaigns had hoped for. And the Democratic National Committee's rising thresholds to qualify for the debate stage in November are so far proving difficult for more than seven or eight candidates to achieve -- leaving those who don't make the stage with little hope of breaking out in front of a large national audience.
#KeepDemsInRace

Benjamin Hart at New York Magazine explains some campaigns may be looking at past candidates who have surged in popularity late in the season. These candidates maintain hope they will experience similar late surges in momentum if they just stay the course.

The line you hear from these campaigns is that in certain past contests, like in 1976 with Jimmy Carter or 2004 with John Kerry, the eventual winner was way, way behind at this point, and then rode a sudden, late surge all the way to victory. 
#KeepDemsInRace

Other candidates feel it is their civic duty to remain in the race to continue elevating their issues. They are less in the race to win at this point than to push their opponents and the party at large to address their concerns. Per PBS

“Some of the candidates in the field believe that they have a message that needs to be incorporated into Democratic messaging for 2020,” Amy Walter of the nonpartisan Cook Political Report said. Running for president gives them a “national platform and national access that they would never have by just being a United States senator. It’s sort of a win-win in that sense.”
FINAL RESULTS
Politics
Should candidates drop out if they didn't make the debate?
A festive crown for the winner
#DemsNeedToDropOut
#KeepDemsInRace