Who do you want to be president—Kamala Harris or Donald Trump? | The Tylt

Who do you want to be president—Kamala Harris or Donald Trump?

After an extremely strong showing in the first Democratic debate, Sen. Kamala Harris saw a bump in the polls. Soon after, however, she was roundly criticized for a slew of policies many voters considered weak. Additionally, she has had to contend with her conservative record as a prosecutor and attorney general in California. Going toe-to-toe with frontrunner Joe Biden in the debates made many believe Harris could beat Donald Trump in the general election. Would you support her?

FINAL RESULTS
Politics
Who do you want to be president—Kamala Harris or Donald Trump?
A festive crown for the winner
#TrumpOverHarris
#IWantPresHarris
Dataviz
Real-time Voting
Who do you want to be president—Kamala Harris or Donald Trump?
#TrumpOverHarris
#IWantPresHarris

On poll after poll, Democratic voters say the ability to unseat Donald Trump in a general election is the quality they value most in a Democratic candidate. As of September 2019, the field is lead by former Vice President Joe Biden, Sen. Bernie Sanders, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, Sen. Kamala Harris and Mayor Pete Buttigieg. We want to know who you would vote for over President Donald Trump in the general election. 

#IWantPresHarris

Harris, who is only the second Black woman to serve in the Senate, rose to prominence mostly on the strength of her charisma and skill during numerous contentious Senate hearings. The Washington Post reports Harris' supporters feel she showcases the wit and gravitas they would look for in a president.

“It was the way she interrogated Barr,” said Ernest McManus, a Vietnam vet and retired maintenance mechanic, an admirer who had come to hear her in Anderson. He was referring to Harris’s big media moment in May: the grilling to which she subjected Attorney General William P. Barr as he appeared before the Senate Judiciary Committee to answer questions about the Mueller report.
“She showed that leadership quality,” McManus added. “She can stand up to any man.”
#IWantPresHarris

Harris has taken a strong stance on several specific issues, including the gender wage gap. In an op-ed that ran in Teen Vogue, the senator encouraged social changes she believes would bring about a decrease in the wage gap.

First, let’s acknowledge the societal pressures that discourage women from negotiating a higher starting salary or knocking on a boss’s door to ask for a raise. One study found that while half of men negotiated for their salary, only 1 out of 8 women did. So let’s encourage women to advocate for themselves in spite of what society may say.
...Second, employers must step up. Take Salesforce, a software company based in San Francisco, which initiated a company-wide review of salaries by pay, job responsibilities, location, and educational level. When they found unexplained pay inequalities, they adjusted salaries. This move affected 6% of Salesforce’s 17,000 employees, cost $3 million, and didn’t stop Salesforce from posting impressive revenue growth last year. A number of other companies, including Apple and Facebook, have taken similar steps. More should follow their example.
Third, we need to demand and pass laws that ensure fair pay and family-friendly workplaces. My home state of California has one of the best equal pay laws in the country, including requirements to reduce disparities across racial and ethnic lines. We can still do better, but I’m encouraged that California’s 14 cent wage gap is now among the 10 smallest in the nation.
#IWantPresHarris

Harris is one of the few lawmakers who has proposed an actionable plan to protect abortion rights. Per Vox:

Kamala Harris has a new plan to limit state-level abortion restrictions, and it’s modeled after the Voting Rights Act.
Under Harris’s proposal, states whose abortion-related laws have recently been struck down by courts for violating Roe v. Wade would have to obtain federal approval from the Justice Department before they’re able to implement any new abortion laws.
It’s similar to a key provision of the landmark 1965 Voting Rights Act, which required states that had implemented discriminatory voting practices in the past to get Justice Department clearance to enforce additional laws. As a result of this requirement, the department blocked 86 election-related updates that could have disenfranchised people of color between 1998 and 2013, according to Harris’s campaign.
#TrumpOverHarris

Harris has, overall, branded herself as something of a centrist candidate. She is not touting the same kinds of exciting policies and proposals as her fellow senators Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders. As Politico reports, moderate candidates frequently struggle to differentiate themselves and excite the number of supporters they need in order to take the White House.

Harris’ big challenge will be breaking through on policy in a way that captivates voters and tells a broader story — about herself, but also what she’s trying to accomplish. Ben LaBolt, a veteran of Barack Obama’s presidential campaigns, credited Harris’ tough stance against Trump, calling it smart. “Democratic voters are looking for a candidate that can take the fight to Trump and win,” LaBolt said.
...LaBolt suggested it won't be as easy for Harris to stand out on policy. “As the Clinton campaign learned, it is difficult for pragmatism to match or drown out Trump’s provocation in the headlines — and driving powerful and memorable moments to communicate our message will be more powerful than white papers this cycle,” he said.
#TrumpOverHarris

Harris' record as a political moderate has followed her since her days as attorney general in California. Per the Atlantic:

As attorney general, she declined to support two ballot measures to end the death penalty. She declined to support making drug possession a misdemeanor. She declined to support legalizing pot. She declined to support a ballot measure reforming California’s brutal three-strikes law. The point is: She had power. She kept most of it in reserve. More important than fixing the broken criminal-justice system, it seemed, was protecting her status as a rising star. She had earned that reputation by the time the first major profile of her was written: San Francisco Magazine, 2007. The article also described her as “maddeningly elusive.”
#TrumpOverHarris

In a New York Times op-ed, Lara Bazelon, the former director of the Loyola Law School Project for the Innocent in Los Angeles, argued that Harris was not only conservative, she actively worked against criminal justice reformers to uphold wrongful convictions.

Time after time, when progressives urged her to embrace criminal justice reforms as a district attorney and then the state’s attorney general, Ms. Harris opposed them or stayed silent. Most troubling, Ms. Harris fought tooth and nail to uphold wrongful convictions that had been secured through official misconduct that included evidence tampering, false testimony and the suppression of crucial information by prosecutors.
Consider her record as San Francisco’s district attorney from 2004 to 2011. Ms. Harris was criticized in 2010 for withholding information about a police laboratory technician who had been accused of “intentionally sabotaging” her work and stealing drugs from the lab. After a memo surfaced showing that Ms. Harris’s deputies knew about the technician’s wrongdoing and recent conviction, but failed to alert defense lawyers, a judge condemned Ms. Harris’s indifference to the systemic violation of the defendants’ constitutional rights.
Ms. Harris contested the ruling by arguing that the judge, whose husband was a defense attorney and had spoken publicly about the importance of disclosing evidence, had a conflict of interest. Ms. Harris lost. More than 600 cases handled by the corrupt technician were dismissed.
FINAL RESULTS
Politics
Who do you want to be president—Kamala Harris or Donald Trump?
A festive crown for the winner
#TrumpOverHarris
#IWantPresHarris