Should the government provide debt-free college? | The Tylt

Should the government provide debt-free college?

Student loan debt has skyrocketed in the United States, with debt increasing by 102 percent since 2009. Young people are saddled with decades of debt, hindering their ability to purchase homes and actively participate in the economy. However, college degrees are considered a necessity for most new jobs, with nine out of 10 new jobs created in 2017 going to people with some form of higher education. Some say the government should start paying for this new necessity. What do you think?

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Should the government provide debt-free college?
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Student loan debt is now one the largest financial burdens Americans carry. Per Forbes

The latest student loan debt statistics for 2019 show how serious the student loan debt crisis has become for borrowers across all demographics and age groups. There are more than 44 million borrowers who collectively owe $1.5 trillion in student loan debt in the U.S. alone. Student loan debt is now the second highest consumer debt category - behind only mortgage debt - and higher than both credit cards and auto loans. Borrowers in the Class of 2017, on average, owe $28,650, according to the Institute for College Access and Success.
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Many argue simply turning financial aid over to state and federal governments will not solve the problem. Currently, financial aid comes from myriad sources, both public and private. Private funding is frequently more stable than its federal counterpart, as there is no requirement to balance budgets or fights over cutting taxes to change their bottom line. Per the Nation

The question of financial sustainability looms largest for legislators. It’s easier to promise a free degree down the line when budgeting one fiscal year at a time. College Promise programs are typically funded by a hodgepodge of private and public sources, from technology and oil companies to liberal philanthropic trusts, or even state lottery funds. If state budgets are as unstable as poor students’ yearly incomes, a Promise could turn out to be just as precarious, subject to political whims, or the politicized agendas of large donors (like tech companies looking for STEM graduates), all of which could make it nearly impossible to guarantee funding for the duration of students’ long-term degree programs. (Besides, many could suffer from low job prospects even after graduation).
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Even if funding was subsidized by the government, the relationship between states and the federal government is frequently antagonistic. In July 2018, Democrats proposed a bill which they hoped would overhaul tuition funding. According to the Washington Post, it also pointed out some glaring issues with federal oversight of education. 

Democrats are proposing to give students the chance to earn a degree without debt, in part by creating a state-federal partnership that calls on states to provide two years of community college tuition-free. In exchange for federal funding, states would have to promise to invest more in higher education — and maintain those investments.
But such a requirement would probably face pushback even in some states with liberal-leaning politicians, said Robert Kelchen, assistant professor of higher education at Seton Hall University in New Jersey. In many states, legislators shift money from higher education to other areas in which spending is mandated. “Taking away that flexibility would be a nonstarter in many states,” he said.
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Even if states agree to work with the federal government, problems could quickly arise. States also have a history of micromanaging where and how educational money is spent. The Atlantic describes restrictions which could be put on state money. 

But the disadvantage of focusing on state programs is that states simply have less money. “Doing it at the state level is uniquely challenging just because there are much more severe budgetary constraints,” Dancy told me. That means there are limitations on the amount of money they can—and are willing to—spend on free-college programs. But it also means that states put restrictions on programs to keep costs down, including limiting the tuition-free program to coursework at community colleges; only allowing students to study certain subjects; or requiring students to live and work in the state for several years after the program is complete. And then there are sometimes eligibility requirements on the front end. Some states only offer free tuition to recent high-school graduates with a certain GPA; or they may mandate a drug test.
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However, proponents of debt-free college—unlike "free college," which does not provide funding for outside costs such as housing and books—say plans can be flexible and integrate many services already being used. Per the Atlantic

The United States has a long history of college-access and -affordability policies—the first Morrill Act, the GI Bill, etc.—that did not provide equitable access or universal affordability, particularly for minorities. Advocates hope that a similar mistake won’t be made with a potential national free-college policy, and that debt-free college becomes the new gold standard.
“That’s the beauty of debt-free college programs: There is a lot of flexibility in there on policy design,” Mark Huelsman, a policy director at Demos, a liberal think tank, told me. A candidate could, for example, propose massively expanding access to the Pell Grant program so that more working- and middle-class students were eligible, and then subsidize education at HBCUs or private institutions that serve large shares of low-income students. A policy could, as Senator Brian Schatz’s Debt-Free College Act does, incentivize states to invest more in free-college programs by providing a one-to-one federal match on state spending.
FINAL RESULTS
Politics
Should the government provide debt-free college?
#WeNeedFreeCollege
A festive crown for the winner
#KeepCollegePrivate