Would you vote for a criminal or a deceased person? | The Tylt

Would you vote for a criminal or a deceased person?

Amidst many surprising midterm outcomes, none was more surprising than the results of the election for representative of Nevada's 36th Assembly District. Nevadans voted, overwhelmingly, for deceased brothel owner and accused sexual abuser Dennis Hof. Nevada's not the only state with questionable taste in candidates. While Florida just recently voted to give felons the right to vote, Michael Grimm, a convicted felon, was running for office in New York. Some say there should be stricter guidelines on who can run for office, while others claim the voters deserve the right to decide. What do you think?

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Would you vote for a criminal or a deceased person?
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Would you vote for a criminal or a deceased person?
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The convicted criminal candidates were charged with a range of crimes, many of which would seem to show character traits the public would not want in their elected officials. 

[Joe] Arpaio was convicted of misdemeanor criminal contempt of court in July 2017 for defying a court order requiring him to stop illegally detaining people he suspected of being undocumented immigrants based on their race. President Donald Trump pardoned him one month later.
The other convicted criminals running for office as Republicans are Don Blankenship, the former head of the coal mining company Massey Energy who is running in the Republican primary to challenge Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.); former Rep. Michael Grimm, who is challenging incumbent Rep. Dan Donovan (R-N.Y.) to reclaim the Staten Island congressional seat he once held; and Rep. Greg Gianforte (R-Mont.), who is running for re-election.
Blankenship served one year in prison on a misdemeanor conviction for conspiring to evade safety laws after the death of 29 miners at his Upper Big Branch Mine in 2010. Grimm, a former FBI agent, pleaded guilty to felony tax evasion in 2014. And last year, Gianforte also pleaded guilty to misdemeanor assault for body-slamming a reporter days before winning a 2017 special election. So far, the national Republican Party has said it supports Donovan over Grimm, but it is also backing Gianforte, who is the only one of these convicted candidates currently in office. The party has not endorsed anyone in either West Virginia or Arizona.
The only Democrat with a record running for office is David Alcorn, convicted of stalking, who is one of nine candidates for the party’s nomination in New Mexico’s 2nd Congressional District. The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee would not support Alcorn, saying “he is not fit to run for office.”
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Some of the candidates, however, attempted to spin their convictions as positives. They said their convictions put them in a league of conservatives who have been persecuted by the liberal government. Per the Washington Post

Former New York congressman Michael Grimm is a felon who has admitted to hiring undocumented workers, hiding $900,000 from tax authorities and making false statements under oath. To hear him tell it, that’s a reason Staten Island Republicans should vote him back into office.
“It’s almost identical to what the president has been going through,” Grimm says of the federal investigation that led to his imprisonment. “It’s not an accident that under the Obama administration, the Justice Department was used politically. And that is all starting to come out.”
Grimm has uncovered a new reality in the constantly changing world of Republican politics: Criminal convictions, once seen as career-enders, are no longer disqualifying. In the era of President Trump, even time spent in prison can be turned into a positive talking point, demonstrating a candidate’s battle scars in a broader fight against what he perceives as liberal corruption.
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Criminal convictions were the least of some candidate's problems. Dennis Hof won his Nevada district handily. While some people felt that any one of Hof's issues should disqualify him from seeking and winning elected office, clearly the people of Nevada disagreed.

Mr. Hof’s candidacy was not derailed by accusations of sexual assault and rape and a state investigation into allegations against him.
Nor was his campaign thwarted by attacks on his support for prostitution: Critics said that the state’s brothels fostered abuse and exploitation, and that Mr. Hof’s candidacy was detrimental to women.
Certainly, death was no obstacle, as thousands of people marched past polling site signs that read “NOTICE OF DEATH OF CANDIDATE” on their way to vote for Mr. Hof. (In fact, death has not stopped a number of candidates from winning office.)
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While it's hard to spin the lack of a pulse as positive, Hof may have gained supporters posthumously. Jennifer O'Kane, one of two women who accused Hof of sexual assault, told the New York Times that many people were determined to vote for a Republican, and his passing may have alleviated heir worries about casting their ballots for a man with questionable morals.

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FINAL RESULTS
Politics
Would you vote for a criminal or a deceased person?
A festive crown for the winner
#VoteNoOnDeadGuys
#VoteForWhoever