Would you take the job as Donald Trump's chief of staff? | The Tylt

Would you take the job as Donald Trump's chief of staff?

After months of speculation, President Donald Trump has finally announced that Chief of Staff John Kelly will be leaving his post at the end of the year. Nick Ayers, Trump's first choice for the typically prestigious position, actually declined the position—opting to spend more time with his family. While most political operatives would do anything for the chief of staff position, Trump makes the choice is a little more difficult. Yes, you're one of the most powerful people in the West Wing, but you're also going to need to lawyer up real quick. Would you take it?

FINAL RESULTS
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Would you take the job as Donald Trump's chief of staff?
#WorkForTheNation
A festive crown for the winner
#NoChiefForTrump
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Would you take the job as Donald Trump's chief of staff?
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#NoChiefForTrump
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Taking the chief of staff position used to be a guaranteed stepping stone to just about any other political position you could want. Yet, Politico reports working with Trump seems to have a way of tarnishing people's reputations.

A job that was once a ticket to Washington royalty has recently become a laughing stock. Trump’s first two top aides, Kelly and Reince Priebus before him, have left as diminished and arguably humiliated figures, unable to control the wild chaos of this president’s White House. Priebus was marginalized and mocked before he was abandoned on an airport tarmac. Kelly was subjected to analyses of his facial expressions during awkward moments, repeatedly threatened to quit, and wasn’t even allowed to announce his own resignation despite a reported agreement with Trump that he could do so.
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However, Trump claims he has a lot of candidates to choose from. 

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Working for Trump, the chief of staff must contend with a man who refuses to change to address the challenges of the job. Most of the people previously tasked with managing him, according to the Washington Post, seem to have been driven a little nuts by his behavior.

A chief of staff must manage both down and up, but the 72-year-old in the Oval Office seems pretty set in his habits. Trump also wants it both ways. He wants his White House to run “like a fine-tuned machine,” as he’s said it does, but – ever the showman – he also likes the reality TV vibe, where people are constantly left wondering where they stand and if they’ll get written off in the next episode.
To put it mildly, Trump doesn’t sweat the small stuff. Former secretary of state Rex Tillerson described some of his frustrations with advising an “undisciplined” president during an event in Houston last Thursday night. “What was challenging for me coming from the disciplined, highly process-oriented ExxonMobil corporation,” Tillerson said, was “to go to work for a man who is pretty undisciplined, doesn’t like to read, doesn’t read briefing reports, doesn’t like to get into the details of a lot of things, but rather just kind of says, ‘This is what I believe.’ … So often the president would say, ‘Here’s what I want to do, and here’s how I want to do it’ and I would have to say to him, ‘Mr. President, I understand what you want to do, but you can’t do it that way. It violates the law.’ ”
The president responded hours later by saying that he fired Tillerson because he “didn’t have the mental capacity needed”: “He was dumb as a rock and I couldn’t get rid of him fast enough. He was lazy as hell.”
As far as the president is concerned, nothing is ever his fault. The guy in the adjacent office is a natural scapegoat, maybe even more so than whoever is at Foggy Bottom.
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You'd also be joining a well-established group of individuals set on thwarting the president's behavior, which would certainly provide an exciting and challenging work environment. Per the infamous anonymous New York Times op-ed: 

That is why many Trump appointees have vowed to do what we can to preserve our democratic institutions while thwarting Mr. Trump’s more misguided impulses until he is out of office.
...The erratic behavior would be more concerning if it weren’t for unsung heroes in and around the White House. Some of his aides have been cast as villains by the media. But in private, they have gone to great lengths to keep bad decisions contained to the West Wing, though they are clearly not always successful.
#NoChiefForTrump

That said, you're also going to have to get a lawyer very quickly. Per CNN:

He or she will also inherit a White House that is more deeply threatened by a criminal investigation and allegations of abuse of power than at any time since the Nixon administration. And every week, the situation gets darker with the President under threat from formidable prosecutors on two fronts -- from Mueller who works under the supervision of the Justice Department and from the US Attorney for the Southern District of New York.
Several weeks of disclosures by Mueller have made it clear that the President and his West Wing are now directly threatened by the investigation.
Therefore, anyone coming into the Trump White House from outside will do so in the knowledge that they are entering a situation that could expose them to reputational, political and even personal legal jeopardy.
The new chief of staff will work for a President who has been accused, effectively by his own Justice Department, of directing and cooperating in the commission of a crime -- in payoffs to women who accused him of affairs, in contravention of campaign finance laws.
#NoChiefForTrump

Yet, it doesn't seem to take a rocket scientist to control the president. According to Bob Woodward's book "Fear," all one has to do is yank a piece of paper from the president's desk and poof, no new legislation! 

Mr. Woodward’s reporting adds another layer to a recurring theme in the Trump White House: frustrated aides who sometimes resort to extraordinary measures to thwart the president’s decisions — a phenomenon the author describes as “an administrative coup d’état.” In addition to Mr. Mattis and Mr. Cohn, he recounts the tribulations of Mr. Kelly and his predecessor, Reince Priebus, whose tensions with Mr. Trump have been reported elsewhere.
Mr. Cohn, Mr. Woodward said, told a colleague he had removed the letter about the Korea free trade agreement to protect national security. Later, when the president ordered a similar letter authorizing the departure of the United States from the North American Free Trade Agreement, Mr. Cohn and other aides plotted how to prevent him from going ahead with a move they feared would be deeply destabilizing.
“I can stop this,” Mr. Cohn said to the staff secretary, Rob Porter, according to the book. “I’ll just take the paper off his desk.”
FINAL RESULTS
Politics
Would you take the job as Donald Trump's chief of staff?
#WorkForTheNation
A festive crown for the winner
#NoChiefForTrump