Should male presidential candidates pick female vice presidents? | The Tylt

Should male presidential candidates pick female vice presidents?

After a splashy first weekend on the campaign trail, Beto O'Rourke once again turned heads by telling an Iowa crowd if he wins the nomination, he will pick a female vice president. Sen. Cory Booker made a similar statement, saying if he wins the nomination, "there will be a woman on the ticket." Some political experts were quick to point out neither man has won the nomination, and they are competing against a large field of women who want the top job, not to play second fiddle. What do you think?

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Beto O'Rourke kicked off his campaign in high-profile fashion—an artfully done Vanity Fair cover, an eye-popping $6 million in donations, putting his feet all over Iowa's coffee shop countertops. With such a successful rollout, it's probably forgivable that O'Rourke is acting extremely confident, going so far as to begin speculating who he will pick as his running mate. 

The New York Times reports it is "highly unusual" for a candidate to start talking about the demographics of their vice president 10 months before Iowans caucus, but O'Rourke is not the only candidate to makes such a claim. 

“It would be very difficult not to select a woman, with so many extraordinary women who are running right now,” Mr. O’Rourke told reporters in Iowa on Saturday night. But, he noted, “first, I would have to win, and this is as open as it’s ever been.”
...[Sen. Cory] Booker told voters in New Hampshire that he was “confident” the party would “make history” with their nominee.
“No matter what — I’m looking you in the eye and saying this — there will be a woman on the ticket,” he said. “I don’t know if it’s in the vice president’s position or the president’s position, but if I have my way, there will be a woman on the ticket.”
#WomanForPres

Some political experts were annoyed by the treatment O'Rourke received from the media and his apparent confidence in his ability to win the party's nomination. Politico reports O'Rourke has garnered substantially more media attention than any other candidate, especially the women. 

Elizabeth Warren has "dispensed three major policy proposals, held 30 campaign events and visited nearly a dozen states," yet has received a small fraction of the airtime O'Rourke has. The sheer fact that O'Rourke was asked about his vice president shows a double standard in the eyes of many politicos. 

“I feel like the media is always captivated by the person they seem to think is a phenom: Bernie. Trump. Beto. But they always seem to be white men who are phenoms. In a year where we have more choices than ever, more women and more persons of color than ever, none of them seem to be deemed a phenom,” said Mary Anne Marsh, a Democratic political consultant.
“It’s a replay of Donald Trump vs. Hillary Clinton. Instead, it’s Beto O’Rourke in the Bernie Sanders role, to the detriment of every woman running. Not one woman got that kind of coverage. Not one. Not Kamala. Not Kirsten. Not Elizabeth Warren. Not Amy Klobuchar in a blizzard.”

These women are looking to become president. Not play second fiddle to a male candidate.

FINAL RESULTS
Politics
Should male presidential candidates pick female vice presidents?
A festive crown for the winner
#PickAFemaleVP
#WomanForPres