Should Beto O'Rourke run for president in 2020? | The Tylt

Should Beto O'Rourke run for president in 2020?

After coming shockingly close to turning the reliably red state of Texas blue, Beto O'Rourke has skyrocketed to the top of many Democrats' lists of top presidential candidates. O'Rourke, a Democratic representative from Texas' 16th district, has five years of experience in the House and was narrowly defeated in his bid for Senate by incumbent Sen. Ted Cruz. O'Rourke has the charisma and message needed to excite voters. Yet, some people wonder if 2020 is too early for him to be looking at a presidential run. What do you think?

FINAL RESULTS
Politics
Should Beto O'Rourke run for president in 2020?
A festive crown for the winner
#RunBetoRun
#CoolItBeto
Dataviz
Real-time Voting
Should Beto O'Rourke run for president in 2020?
#RunBetoRun
#CoolItBeto
#RunBetoRun

O'Rourke recently posted a stream of consciousness Medium post about going for a jog around D.C. in the snow. Many pundits and political junkies wondered whether the run he was really talking about was one for president. 

Writer Luke O'Neil did a deep dive into the myriad potential metaphors discovered in O'Rourke's post for the GuardianO'Neil's conclusion? O'Rourke's jog was just a thinly veiled hint at what's to come for the politician. 

‘Came back up and put my tights, shorts, long socks, tshirt and overshirt on. Hat and gloves, my running shoes and was outside by 7:45’
As the blogpost opens, we find O’Rourke going about his morning routine, outfitting himself in warm clothing, like a warrior donning his armor, to withstand the harsh reception he is sure to face. From the elements, yes, but also from the political climate. What is he preparing for? A run.
‘Once on the Mall it was better, the snow hitting me from the right side (blowing almost due south). There were in some places no tracks, mine were the first footprints down in the new snow. At other points I’d see someone walking in front of me, once another runner (‘only the crazies come out today!’ he said)’
Here O’Rourke references the direction from which he is being attacked. From the right side, which is clear enough, and blowing due south, there being few places in the country further south than his home state of Texas. He will come in for a lot more of that in the years to come if he is intending to run for president.
His being the first footprints in fresh snow is too sophisticated a metaphor for me to unpack here, sorry.
As for “the crazies” line, is this man giving voice to the idea that you’d have to be a glutton for punishment to run against Trump?
#RunBetoRun

O'Rourke was invited by the Democratic Party in Des Moines, Iowaone of the most influential local political groups in the countryto meet with them. Iowa holds the country's first contest of the presidential election and the invitation is seen as an indication that the party believes he could win locally. Per Newsweek

The Democratic Party in Des Moines, where one-third of Iowa’s Democratic voters reside, sent O’Rourke the invitation on Monday, according to The Dallas Morning News.
“We would love to host him,” Polk County Democratic Chairman Sean Bagniewski told the newspaper in a report published Tuesday.
“It’s real. In Iowa, everybody knows the next person that they want to meet, and by far he is the No. 1 person that’s being requested right now—volunteers, elected officials, our membership base,” Bagniewski said. “Everybody right now is asking for Beto.”
Bagniewski called O’Rourke “unapologetically progressive” and likened O’Rourke to former President Barack Obama, who similarly rose suddenly in popularity but who'd won a Senate seat first, unlike the Texas congressman.
“He’s a young face. He wasn’t afraid to be himself. Democrats are often very poll tested, very consultant-driven. He was more authentic in a way that people haven’t seen since Barack Obama,” Bagniewski said. “So he connected with people nationwide in ways that some of our more cautious political leaders haven’t.”
#CoolItBeto

However, O'Rourke may not be the perfect candidate many Democrats believe him to be. Per the Daily Dot:

While O’Rourke may be popular, he may not be as outwardly progressive as many Democratic primary voters may want.
The former Senate candidate’s record on the economy and immigration have been called center-left—issues that could become major components of the 2020 election against Trump. However, O’Rourke’s viral moments—such as his defense of NFL players who kneel during the national anthem to protest police brutality against people of color—could endear him to some primary voters.
...O’Rourke could run into a situation where he is competing for enthusiasm among voters with the likes of Harris–who has shot up in popularity during her first term in office by challenging the Trump administration. He could also be deemed not progressive enough from voters who back 2020-likelies like Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) or Sen. Bernie Sanders I-Vt.).
#CoolItBeto

O'Rourke also lacks some of the political skills and experience he would need to be competitive on a national level. Per the Dallas News:

Limited national political experience. Running for president is very hard, and no House member has won the presidency since James Garfield without also holding higher office. His staff's experience is limited; many came from his congressional staff, though others worked in 2016 Clinton or Sanders campaigns.
...His debate skills are still a work in progress. In his 2018 confrontations against Cruz, he sometimes seemed unsure how to deal with aggressive attacks. Debates are one way in which a large field is winnowed.
FINAL RESULTS
Politics
Should Beto O'Rourke run for president in 2020?
A festive crown for the winner
#RunBetoRun
#CoolItBeto