Are refugees a threat to Europe? | The Tylt

Are refugees a threat to Europe?

The migrant crisis has been raging in Europe this summer, with the number of refugees arriving on the Mediterranean coast increasing by 20 percent since 2016. EU immigration dominates political discourse and polarizes opinions. Proponents say not only does Europe have a moral obligation to help migrants seeking refuge, but migrants boost the economy and drive innovation. Opponents argue the cultural and economic cost placed upon Europe outweighs any benefits. What do you think? 🚣🏽

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Are refugees a threat to Europe?
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Europe’s history has long been shaped by migration. However, the end of the Cold War lifted the lid on wars and ethnic conflicts, mainly in the Middle East and Africa, causing refugees to flee to the rich, liberal democracies of the West. 

Europe's refugee policy is flawed and inconsistent. Poland, Hungary, and the Czech Republic have closed their borders, though the EU is taking legal action against all three states due after failing to comply with EU refugee quotas. France, Austria and the UK are extremely wary of taking refugees in. The President of France, Emmanuel Macron, said: “On the subject of refugees, France hasn’t taken its fair share.” Most countries have free-wheeled off Germany’s open-door policy, who accepted 1.1 million on its soil in 2015, according to the German government.

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Supporters would say that Europe has a moral obligation to help refugees, no matter what the cost. As wealthy ex-colonial powers, they have plenty of resources to share. Conditions are unimaginably harsh for these asylum seekers; 1-in-40 people die attempting to sail from Libya to the Mediterranean coast on rubber dinghies, and if they do arrive, they must spend several months in cramped camps, where crime, depression, and suicide are rife.

The majority of Europe has long assumed a moral authority over the rest of the world but is taking an ‘out of sight, out of mind’ mentality when it comes to the migrant crisis. Europe must show to the world that it still champions a culture that values human rights by helping the refugees waiting off their shores.

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However, many fear E.U. immigration because of the supposed cultural tension between Christianity and Islam. Douglas Murray, a well-known English journalist, argues in the face of the migrant crisis, Europe is losing sight of its culture, its values, and its faith, leading to a deep crisis in identity. He claims the differences between Muslim and European heritage, which have had a long history of opposition, make it difficult for Muslim immigrants to easily integrate into Europe. 

Some think that this ‘Clash of Civilizations’ is the main driver of the recent terrorist attacks across the E.U. An anti-refugee organization called 'Defend Europe' has even set sail to try and block refugees from reaching the European coastline.

Douglas Murray said in an interview

"I don't say no migrants into Europe. I don't say that at all. But you've got to massively slow down the flow because a society doesn't have a hope of remaining cohesive when you have migration at these levels. The second thing is you work on the people who are already here more. The third thing is that you make it clear that as well as speaking the language of inclusion in our politics, we have to speak the language of exclusion - what it is that we won't tolerate as well as what it is that we do and what it is we will be tolerant of."
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But pro-immigration experts would explain that there is no evidence that migration leads to higher terrorist activity, and that policies restricting refugees from assimilating into the population may be more harmful.

Europe has an aging population that will decline over the next 50 years; a young workforce of refugees might be exactly what Europe needs.

For example, Italy will lose 28 percent of its current working population by 2050. In order to maintain its labor force, it would need to start importing more than 350,000 immigrants per year, or keep all citizens working until they are 75!

Not to mention, the increase in tax revenues, innovation and entrepreneurship will give Europe's economy the boost it needs in the long-run.

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But others would differentiate between economic migrants and refugees, explaining that only the former truly benefit the economy.

Unlike most high-skilled economic migrants, refugees don't come to Europe because of career opportunities and making the trip does not guarantee success in the job market. The German commissioner for Immigration, Refugees and Integration, explained that three-quarters of the refugees Germany has taken in will still be unemployed in the next five years. They worry the supposed payoff in tax revenues will not compare to the pressure put on public services, such as welfare. 

Even Jeremy Corbyn, the left-leaning leader of the Labour party in the U.K., has expressed anti-immigration sentiments recently. Corbyn claimed mass immigration into the U.K. would ‘destroy’ the conditions of British workers, defending Brexit and stricter border control.

FINAL RESULTS
Politics
Are refugees a threat to Europe?
A festive crown for the winner
#OpenEUBorders
#Europe4Europeans