Should blueprints for 3D-printed guns be protected by the First Amendment? | The Tylt

Should blueprints for 3D-printed guns be protected by the First Amendment?

Sharing and downloading blueprints for 3D-printed guns in the U.S., while tied up in a messy court drama, is now theoretically legal. This new policy comes after the Trump administration settled a lawsuit filed by DIY gunmaker Cody Wilson, who argued the government violated both his Second Amendment and First Amendment rights by prohibiting him from sharing gun blueprints online. But eight states and the District of Columbia have sued the government to prevent the release of the blueprints, claiming they pose a danger to the public. What do you think?

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Should blueprints for 3D-printed guns be protected by the First Amendment?
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The U.S. State Department initially ordered Cody Wilson—a DIY gunmaker and anarchist—to remove his blueprints for 3D-printed guns from the Internet, based on a set of regulations knowns as the International Trade in Arms Regulations. According to these rules, by sharing the blueprints for a weapon widely online, Wilson had exported weapons without a license. Wilson countered he was not sharing weapons, but sharing information and should, therefore, be protected by the First Amendment. 

"If code is speech, the constitutional contradictions are evident," Wilson explained to WIRED when he first launched the lawsuit in 2015. "So what if this code is a gun?”
Wilson believes it doesn't matter what the code ultimately builds, it's protected under the First Amendment. 
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On July 30, attorneys general from eight states and the District of Columbia filed a lawsuit against the federal government in an attempt to prevent the release of the plans the next day. According to NPR, the court documents state:

"3-D printed guns are functional weapons that are often unrecognizable by standard metal detectors because they are made out of materials other than metal (e.g., plastic) and untraceable because they contain no serial numbers. Anyone with access to the [Computer Aided Design] files and a commercially available 3-D printer could readily manufacture, possess, or sell such a weapon—even those persons statutorily ineligible to possess firearms, including violent felons, the mentally ill and persons subject to protection and no-contact orders."
The attorneys general contend because of the danger posed by these 3D-printed guns, the blueprints should not be publicly available.
FINAL RESULTS
Politics
Should blueprints for 3D-printed guns be protected by the First Amendment?
#GunPlansAreSpeech
A festive crown for the winner
#GunPlansAreWeapons