Are digital clothes weird or the next big thing? | The Tylt

Are digital clothes weird or the next big thing?

It's no secret that digital rules our lives: our communication, cars, finances and now...our closets? A Scandinavian company named Carlings has been offering high-fashion outfits at bargain prices with one small catch—they don't actually exist. The clothing company's "digital line" allows you to virtually wear runway-style haute couture through photos of yourself uploaded to their site that are then doctored by digital tailors. While the whack factor is undeniably high, Carlings and companies like it claim it's about conservation. Would you buy digital clothes?

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Are digital clothes weird or the next big thing?
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Are digital clothes weird or the next big thing?
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It's like playing digital dress-up on photos of yourself...and paying for it. It's one thing to see how things "look" before you buy, but to not even have tangible clothes to buy at all seems like we've crossed a line. Digital art and photography is one thing, but digital clothing? Not to mention some of these outfits cost upwards of thousands of dollars. There's obviously also a generational gap: Per Bustle, these "items are only likely to appeal to influencers yearning for constant newness" and others who spend inordinate amounts of time curating photos for their social profiles. Whatever happened to a good old-fashioned pair of jeans? Digital clothes are just another passing trend that will, literally, leave you out in the cold. 

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What better way to try on—and publicly showcase—clothing that would otherwise be unattainable to the general masses? Digital garments aren't just about experimentation and creativity; it's the wave of the future. Richard Ma, CEO of Quantstamp and proud downloader of a $9,500 digital gown his wife donned on her Instagram account said, "In 10 years time everybody will be 'wearing' digital fashion. It's a unique memento. It's a sign of the times." And Matthew Drinkwater, head of the London College of Fashion's Fashion Innovation Agency, told Elle magazine, "I think the element of exclusivity that you could create through digital clothing is something that could build that desire and actually return a sense of how we used to shop."

Digital clothing purveyors like Carlings also tout their virtual lines are eco-friendly alternatives to fashion industry waste, as well as combat the overall negative effects of the manufacturing industry. Kerry Murphy of The Fabricant asserts, "We believe the world does not need more clothing. It’s an incredibly wasteful and polluting industry. That’s why we very consciously said we want to re-imagine fashion."

Why spend any more than you have to at department stores when you can actually look like a million bucks online? 

FINAL RESULTS
Entertainment
Are digital clothes weird or the next big thing?
A festive crown for the winner
#DigiWearWeird
#DigiWearSlaps