Scariest movie monster: Pennywise or the Babadook? | The Tylt

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Scariest movie monster: Pennywise or the Babadook?
#TeamPennywise
#TeamBabadook

Just like a classic movie monster, our Monster Madness bracket is back and bigger than ever. We're pitting 16 heavyweight champions of horror against each other all month long, and you decide who wins the grand prize! Last year, Chucky ran away with the whole thing, toppling Freddy Krueger, Pinhead, and Michael Myers for the crown of scariest horror icon ever.

But this year, it's anyone's game—with new contestants Jigsaw, Pennywise, the Babadook and Norman Bates eyeing the haunted throne. Don't forget to cast your vote in our other head-to-head brawls below, and may the scariest monster win! đŸ‘» 🎃 đŸ˜±

#TeamPennywise

Pennywise the Dancing Clown was created by Stephen King for the 1986 horror novel "It," and adapted for television in 1990 by horror journeyman Tommy Lee Wallace and most recently for film by Chase Palmer, Cary Fukunaga, and Gary Dauberman. Released on September 8, 2017, "It" has gone on to become the highest-grossing horror film of all time.

Pennywise is just the most recent disguise for the nameless evil that has terrorized the town of Derry, and Earth, for time immemorial. It originated within the Macroverse, a dimension filled with unspeakable horrors, and came to Earth millions of years ago—probably the result of an asteroid collision.

It has taken on the guise of Pennywise the Dancing Clown to prey on children; kids are easier for Pennywise to fill with terror, which "It" says is like "salting the meat." It awakens every 30 years or so, after a tragic event, to feast and then goes into hibernation.

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Here are 10 things you probably didn't know about Pennywise.

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#TeamBabadook

The Babadook was created by Australian filmmaker Jennifer Kent for the 2014 horror film of the same name. Kent began writing the screenplay back in 2009 and slowly, but surely, began to piece together the backstory for the iconic movie monster. When "The Babadook" was initially released in Australia, it was somewhat of a commercial failure; the film has only grossed $10 million worldwide.

But "The Babadook" was warmly received by critics and developed a cult following on Netflix—where the character accidentally became an LGBTQ icon. The Babadook itself has no real origin, some trace it to an urban legend and others view it as the psychological manifestation of the main character's mental illness and grief. The Babadook makes its way from home to home in a terrifying pop-up book and is violent toward anyone who questions its existence.

Whereever it hails from, the Babadook is terrifying.

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#TeamBabadook

Here are 10 quick facts about the Babadook.

FINAL RESULTS
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Scariest movie monster: Pennywise or the Babadook?
A festive crown for the winner
#TeamPennywise
#TeamBabadook