Favorite '90s workplace comedy: 'Clerks' or 'Office Space'? | The Tylt

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Favorite '90s workplace comedy: 'Clerks' or 'Office Space'?
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Below is the synopsis of "Clerks," per IMDB.

A day in the lives of two convenience clerks named Dante and Randal as they annoy customers, discuss movies, and play hockey on the store roof.

"Clerks" holds a fresh rating of 88 percent and an audience score of 89 percent on Rotten Tomatoes. While "Clerks" is an independent dark comedy that only made an estimated $3.2 million domestically at the box office, it's revered as a cult classic with a heavy impact on Generation X. Roger Ebert wrote about it glowingly in the Chicago Sun-Times when the movie came out:

"Clerks," which contains no nudity or violence, was originally classified NC-17 by the MPAA just on the basis of its language - which includes the kind of graphic descriptions of improbable sex acts that guys sometimes indulge in while killing vast amounts of celibate time. (One sexual encounter does take place during the movie, off screen, and after it becomes clear exactly what happened, we are all pretty much in agreement, I think, that offscreen is where it belongs.) 
Quentin Tarantino has become famous as a video store clerk who watched all the movies in his store, and then went out and directed "Reservoir Dogs" and "Pulp Fiction." Kevin Smith has done him one better, by working behind the counter and then making a movie about the store itself. Within the limitations of his bare-bones production, Smith shows great invention, a natural feel for human comedy, and a knack for writing weird, sometimes brilliant, dialogue.
Much has been written about Generation X and the films about it.
"Clerks" is so utterly authentic that its heroes have never heard of their generation. When they think of "X," it's on the way to the video store.
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Below is the synopsis of "Office Space," per IMDb.

Three company workers who hate their jobs decide to rebel against their greedy boss.

"Office Space" holds a fresh rating of 80 percent and an audience score of 93 percent on Rotten Tomatoes. The comedy made an estimated a paltry $10.8 million domestically at the box office, but that hasn't stopped fans from celebrating 20 years of the cult classic. The movie is so beloved that The Ringer gave an oral history of the film. Back in 1999, Jami Bernard wrote for the New York Daily News:

The supporting cast is very funny and effective, particularly Gary Cole as Peter's superior, the kind of guy who drips condescension as he tells you Friday afternoon to report to work Saturday and Sunday as well.
With a judiciously executed hip-hop soundtrack and the same anti-conformist spirit that informs Judge's TV cartoons, "Office Space" can expect to attract people who aren't even old enough to be stuck in dead-end jobs.
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Favorite '90s workplace comedy: 'Clerks' or 'Office Space'?
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A festive crown for the winner
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