Does Hollywood need to do a better job about discussing mental health? | The Tylt

Does Hollywood need to do a better job about discussing mental health?

Mental health is an important topic as fans mourn the suicides of fashion designer Kate Spade and celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain. Kofi Siriboe of OWN's "Queen Sugar" has a new documentary entitled "WTF is Mental Health?" that explores the benefits of openly discussing mental health. Some think Hollywood has a part to play in removing negative stigmas around mental illness. But some experts believe over-exposing people to suicide in the media can make them suicidal and lead to copycat deaths. What do you think?

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Siriboe released the short documentary to raise awareness about the importance of good mental health. The "Queen Sugar" actor spoke with Huffington Post and said this project benefited his own mental health. 

“Making ‘WTF Is Mental Health?’ has been a part of a healing process for me, one I’m still exploring,” said Siriboe. “It’s the companion piece to ‘Jump,’ a short film I made after a mentor and big brother figure died by suicide, just before I got the call that I’d been cast in ‘Queen Sugar.’ I started working on this beautiful, emotional show and felt how liberating it was to channel my fears into art. As I began to mold ‘Jump,’ I realized the true conversation I was craving centered on young Black people who are figuring out this mental health thing, too.”
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Some believe that if more celebrities discuss mental health it can make a difference for the rest of society. 

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According to CNN, shows like "13 Reason Why" have been scrutinized for portraying suicide because experts fear it could cause more harm than good.

Discussion and media portrayals of suicide, even disturbingly inaccurate ones like those shown in "13 Reasons Why," don't "give people the idea" to kill themselves, but may still contribute to a suicide contagion or, somewhat crudely, "copycat suicides." That's because these portrayals provide a cognitive pathway, a roadmap of sorts, that tricks the minds of those at risk for suicide into believing the lies that their mental illnesses tell them. That is, at some level, they're probably already thinking of it, but rather than releasing those feelings in a controlled burn, the unhelpful content on the screen just adds fuel to a forest fire.
FINAL RESULTS
Entertainment
Does Hollywood need to do a better job about discussing mental health?
A festive crown for the winner
#StepUpHollywood
#DontExploitTheSick