Is it appropriate for celebrities to get political at award shows? | The Tylt

Is it appropriate for celebrities to get political at award shows?

Celebrities have been utilizing popular award ceremonies to raise awareness about the sociopolitical issues in the world for decades. But in the era of the Trump administration, Black Lives Matter and #MeToo, award shows are becoming more and more political. Critics argue award shows should simply focus on entertaining and awarding strong art. But defenders say art is political and diverse, and celebs should use their platform to speak up on pressing issues. What do you think? 🏆✊

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Is it appropriate for celebrities to get political at award shows?
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Award shows getting political aren't anything new. The Washington Post notes there is a long history of talking politics and activism at award shows.

Perhaps it's the captive audience, the live national broadcast, or the room full of (mostly) like-minded celebrities, but for decades, awards shows have been the home of pointed, and sometimes controversial, advocacy statements by celebrities. Just last year at the Golden Globes, Leonardo DiCaprio made headlines when, halfway through his acceptance speech for Best Actor in a Drama for "The Revenant," he moved on from thanking cast and crew members to advocating for Native Americans who live in and near the locations in which "The Revenant" was filmed.
It's hard to say how much of an effect these celebrity rants actually have on the public. The Fix's Aaron Blake took a look at some historical polling on how much people actually care. He boils it down to one central question:
There are basically two camps right now on ever-partisan social media: Those who think Meryl Streep's speech Sunday criticizing President-elect Donald Trump at the Golden Globes was great, and those who think this kind of thing is basically Why Donald Trump Won — i.e., elite Hollywood liberals going after the guy blue-collar voters chose to be their president.
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The Grammys are naturally filled with political moments, with many artists pointing out that music as an artform is overtly political.

Like Janelle Monae eloquently said before introducing Kesha's epic performance of "Praying," it shouldn't be just Hollywood taking a stand against sexual abuse and gender inequalitybut all corners of entertainment, including the music industry.

Cyndi Lauper, Camila Cabello, Audra Day, Julia Michaels and Bebe Rexha sang in solidarity with Kesha in a career-defining rendition of "Praying," which many recognized as the most memorable moment of the evening. The empowerment anthem leads Kesha's Grammy-award nominated album "Rainbow," following her extensive battle in court with her former producer Dr. Luke, who allegedly sexually and emotionally abused her during the early years of her career.

Camila also showed support for DREAMers, children of undocumented immigrants who are currently fighting to stay in the U.S.

"Today, in this room full of music's dreamers, we remember that this country was built by dreamers, for dreamers, chasing the American dream," Cabello said, just after joining Kesha and dozens of other women on the Grammy stage to perform a powerful rendition of "Praying." "I'm here on this stage tonight because, just like the DREAMers, my parents brought me to this country with nothing in their pockets but hope. They showed me what it means to work twice as hard and never give up. And honestly no part of my journey is any different from theirs."

Logic, Alessia Cara and Khalid deliver a powerful message about suicide prevention in "1-800-273-8255," followed by Logic's speech about diversity in America. Kendrick Lamar opened the award show with a politically-charged performance with black soldiers marching behind him.

Music is definitely political, so of course, celebrities are going to showcase sociopolitical messages in their art at award shows.  

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But some detractors argue you can enjoy and be entertainment music without making the art super political. Critics say the Grammys, like the Oscars and Golden Globes, are going out of the way to be more political, and that entertainment and politics should be separate.

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While there have been plenty of political controversies at award shows over the years, the fact that we still talk about some of these moments proves talking politics is effective. More.com listed the best times award shows got political.

The truth is we live in political times, and many expect celebrities to use their platform to raise awareness. While many also criticized award shows for being too political last year, viewers may not only be expecting it but anticipating political drama more than ever in 2018. The Daily Beast's Kevin Fallon wrote that not only does #MeToo deserve to use award shows as a political platform, but other movements deserve the same treatment.

This year, however, the question isn’t whether awards shows will be too political, but just how political they will be—and already there seems to be a palpable desire to make them as political as possible.
In response to both the SAG announcement and the Globes report came a beleaguered sigh—the rah-rah equivalent of a golf clap—that such a public display of solidarity and pursuit of change is taking place in response to the recent spate of sexual misconduct controversies, but was absent even just last year during the “too political” season, when the same support could have and should have been shown for the Black Lives Matter movement.
It reflects an undercurrent of the entire reckoning taking place in the industry, which is the erasure of decades of systemic and institutionalized abuse and silencing of people of color. It took famous white women to bring issues of sexual misconduct to the public’s attention, when people, especially women of color, have fruitlessly been ringing the warning bell, only to have it fall on deaf ears.
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There was backlash for award shows getting too political as we entered the era of President Trump. A-list actor Mark Wahlberg called out elitist liberal celebrities for getting too political and preaching to blue-collar people. In an interview with Task and Purpose, Wahlberg said:

“A lot of celebrities did, do, and shouldn’t,” he told Task & Purpose last week, at a swanky luncheon in New York, held on behalf of his upcoming film “Patriots Day.” We were talking about the parade of actors and musicians who lined up to denounce Donald Trump in the months and weeks leading up to Election Day.
“You know, it just goes to show you that people aren’t listening to that anyway,” he continued. “They might buy your CD or watch your movie, but you don’t put food on their table. You don’t pay their bills. A lot of Hollywood is living in a bubble. They’re pretty out of touch with the common person, the everyday guy out there providing for their family. Me, I’m very aware of the real world. I come from the real world and I exist in the real world. And although I can navigate Hollywood and I love the business and the opportunities it’s afforded me, I also understand what it’s like not to have all that.”
FINAL RESULTS
Entertainment
Is it appropriate for celebrities to get political at award shows?
A festive crown for the winner
#SpeakUpCelebrities
#TakeASeatCelebs