Is ASMR creepy or soothing? | The Tylt

Is ASMR creepy or soothing?

Folks have strong opinions about the latest ASMR trend. Autonomous sensory meridian response is a tingling sensation that is typically activated in reaction to an auditory stimulus and has the potential reduce stress and anxiety. So many videos of people demonstrating ASMR are popping up on the internet that celebrities like Cardi B and Ellen DeGeneres have jumped on the bandwagon. But one major argument is the technique lacks research. Other objections are that it can cause sadness and is just strange. How do you feel about ASMR? 

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Cardi B made an ASMR video for W Magazine and fans loved it. Who knew Cardi was the ASMR queen? Tell us what you think about the phenomena by voting. 

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Folks are using ASMR as a way to cope with their anxiety and depression. According to Dr. Carl W. Bazil, sleep disorder specialist at Columbia University,  ASMR may be worth the hype and can help trick your brain to relax.

“People who have insomnia are in a hyper state of arousal,” he said. “Behavioral treatments — guided imagery, progressive relaxation, hypnosis and meditation — are meant to try to trick your unconscious into doing what you want it to do. A.S.M.R. videos seem to be a variation on finding ways to shut your brain down.” 
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Some argue the idea of folks whispering and cutting things is just weird. According to The New York Times, there is a lack of research done on ASMR and it isn't real science: 

But locating the neurological underpinnings of this trippy sensation won’t be easy. Many of the scientists I reached out to shied away from the subject, saying the area is pseudoscience with a lack of published studies.
FINAL RESULTS
Entertainment
Is ASMR creepy or soothing?
A festive crown for the winner
#LoveASMR
#ASMRIsCreepy