Would you trust a self-driving car?
via AP

Would you trust a self-driving car?

#RatherDriveMyself
#TrustTheCar
Join the conversation and vote below

According to Deloitte, three in four Americans would not trust a self-driving car. Driving purists say they'll never set foot in a self driving car—they trust themselves more than some software. However, self-driving car enthusiasts are quick to point out most accidents are from human error. Self driving cars will save lives in the big picture. Where do you stand? 🚦 🚗

The Votes Are In!
#RatherDriveMyself
#TrustTheCar

Statistically, a perfected self-driving car is safer than a human driver, so it really comes down a matter of opinion and perception. 

Image

Automated vehicles create a whole new sets of risks on top of navigation. The software has to work flawlessly all the time. Even if engineers are able to accomplish this, there's always the risk of tampering. Given enough time, people can get through anything, even the toughest security.

“The motor industry is really strong on safety but if someone tries to interfere with the vehicle, tries to hack it and disrupt it, then these don’t fall under the typical safety issues.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

“Unfortunately living in the world today people do try to tamper with technology. The industry is only just starting to recognise this.”
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

He also said that software would have to be reliable and bug free. “Recent reports analysing software show that 98% of applications have serious defects and in many cases there were 10-15 defects per application,” he said.

The bottom line is self-driving cars are safer than human drivers. The fears of hacking are purely hypothetical and obviously any commercial product would take that into consideration. The combination of sensors and software on a self-driving car gives it access to far more information than a human driver has while operating a vehicle. 

At some point, this technology will become so advanced that lawmakers will be forced to debate whether or not to outlaw manual driving, according to Tesla CEO Elon Musk. There's an argument for it: Deaths and injuries from auto accidents are bad. They would decrease drastically if human error were to cease to be a liability. Plus, you can't drive drunk if you can't actually drive. The counterargument against this perspective, outside of the rah-rah "freedom" appeals, would necessarily center on security. Could hackers take control of your car while it's on the road? 
Image
Post by Kaci Dee.
Image
Post by Luke Landolfi.
Cancel e81adef6e6553af1fd4ae2bf0fb5144e9639f08b71b0987074b13e549d2cbb48

GET OUR LATEST
COMMUNITY NEWS

Please provide a valid email