Will Facebook kill Snapchat? | The Tylt

Dataviz
Real-time Voting
Will Facebook kill Snapchat?
#SnapchatIsOver
#SnapchatWillThrive
#SnapchatIsOver

Facebook has made it clear it wants Snapchat, either by buying it outright or by copying its core features. It makes sense for Facebook to either kill or acquire Snapchat—it's one of Facebook's biggest competitors and one of the few companies that can actually challenge Facebook's near monopoly in the social space. 

Seyrafi said that Facebook buying Snap would "remove one of the very few long-term threats to its business," given Snapchat's dominance among millennials and forecasted growth with older demographics. "Several years ago, survey work showed that many teens were disengaging off of Facebook and moving over to Snap, and investors were quite concerned about the long-term ramifications of losing such a key age cohort," he wrote.
#SnapchatIsOver

Facebook already has such a huge user base between Facebook, Messenger, Instagram and WhatsApp, that making a "good enough" feature would slowly leech away Snapchat's install base and slow their growth. It's already happening. 

Instagram Stories is a success story for Facebook. More than 150 million people use it daily. It's so popular, in fact, that Snap cited Instagram as a potential risk factor in its initial public offering filing. While Snap is still adding daily users quickly, the rate of growth slowed in the second half of 2016, around the same time that Instagram rolled out Stories.
#SnapchatWillThrive

Snapchat's fans think that it's onto something fundamentally new. It recognized a new way to use cameras before Facebook did, and that's why Facebook is on a tear to either purchase or kill Snapchat. Snapchat's founders turned down a $3 billion offer from Facebook for a reason—they know they're onto something big. 

But Snapchat uncovered something deeper about the camera. Not only could we use pictures to document the world, but we could also use them to communicate. Snapchat, which was at first dismissed as a mere sexting app, showed that with the right design, a phone’s camera could add an extra dimension to communication that you couldn’t get with text alone.

Snapchat isn't alone in its efforts to reinvent the camera as a means of communication, but it knows the landscape the best and is going all in. It's focused and it knows what it wants to do—unlike Facebook and its other competitors. 

No company is enabling and benefiting from the rise of visual communication as thoroughly as Snap. Its strategy doesn’t guarantee its success; there are lots of other companies nibbling on the same megatrend, among them YouTube and Instagram, both of which have huge and growing audiences and deep relationships with advertisers.
#SnapchatIsOver

Benedict Evans, a partner at the storied venture capital firm Andreesen Horowitz, sums ups the two theories about Facebook and Snapchat here:

#SnapchatIsOver
#SnapchatWillThrive
#SnapchatWillThrive
#SnapchatIsOver
imageSupportingMedia
#SnapchatIsOver
#SnapchatIsOver
#SnapchatIsOver
Post by Kye Rhomanté.
#SnapchatWillThrive
imageSupportingMedia
#SnapchatWillThrive
#SnapchatWillThrive
#SnapchatWillThrive
Post by Marie Jewel.
FINAL RESULTS
Culture
Will Facebook kill Snapchat?
#SnapchatIsOver
A festive crown for the winner
#SnapchatWillThrive