Which style of BBQ ribs is better: Wet or dry rub? | The Tylt

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Which style of BBQ ribs is better: Wet or dry rub?
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Wet versus dry rub is serious business! It can divide families and split elections. There's no middle ground. You must pick a side.

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To truly master wet barbecue, you have to find the perfect sauce and cook time. It's truly an art and not for the faint of heart. But it's worth it the moment you down one of those smoked ribs slathered in spicy and sweat barbecue sauce. For some, it's truly the only way to dine. 

Here is Primer's breakdown of what wet rub is all about:

What is it? Take a dry rub and add moisture, now you have a wet rub.
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When is wetter better? The wet rub realizes it’s full potential when applied generously and cooked in slowly–slow cooking is the ideal method for flavoring meat all the way through. Ribs, pork chops and bone-in chicken beg for a wet rub; they draw moisture in from the rub while charring the outside. There is nothing quite like pulling a juicy, well glazed pork chop or sticky, bronzed spare ribs off the grill.
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What’s in it? The moisture component can be one or many of these: Beer, wine, bourbon, soy sauce, cider vinegar, vegetable oil (peanut, olive, canola etc.) Worcester sauce, honey, molasses, Dijon mustard, tomato sauce, fruit juice, melted butter and so on. The consistency can range from a grainy paste to a sauce—as long as it sticks to the meat. This spicy and sweet wet rub is incredible on ribs; it is great on pork chops and chicken too.
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#DryRibsFTW

But there's a reason why dry rub has so many barbecue loyalists—it's the preference for purists who are more focused on the quality and texture of the meat than any accoutrements. It takes real skill to pull off. When perfectly executed, the crispy "bark" around the rib is finger-lickin' good and easily bests the sloppy, sweet taste of barbecue sauce.

Here is Primer's breakdown of what wet rub is all about:

What is it? A dry rub is a mixture of herbs and spices, with no liquids. It creates a crust; enhancing flavor without adding moisture.
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When to try dry? A dry rub is great on food that that is cooked faster (at a higher temperature, like on a gas grill) and on food that probably won’t tenderize much, like shrimp or thick chicken breasts. Fish, whether flaky or oily, loves the crunch of a good dry rub. Fish can be great with either rub style but many grill men use dry to add an explosion of taste to the outside without overpowering the taste inside. You might not want to mess with the natural flavor and juices in a fresh, tender steak—a light dry rub will not disturb the internal chemistry.
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What’s in it? Many familiar spices are common in dry rubs: Paprika, dry mustard, chili powder, garlic powder, onion powder, black pepper, unrefined salt, white pepper, lemon pepper, cayenne, coriander, cumin, dried lemon/lime zest, brown sugar, sage and thyme. Improvisation is key; just make it flavorful—trust your instincts; the aroma will tell you a lot about how it will taste.
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Most dry rubs combine equal amounts of 6 to 10 herbs and spices, excluding paprika. Paprika is the base of the majority of rub recipe’s you’ll find. Take this recipe and tweak it any way you see fit, the combination of seasonings works especially well on shrimp and chicken.
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FINAL RESULTS
Culture
Which style of BBQ ribs is better: Wet or dry rub?
A festive crown for the winner
#WetRibsFTW
#DryRibsFTW