Which look is more iconic—Hillary's pantsuits or Bernie's frumpiness? | The Tylt

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Which look is more iconic—Hillary's pantsuits or Bernie's frumpiness?
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You don't often look to presidential candidates for fashion inspiration, but Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders rocked the election with their iconic looks. Bernie's normcore and unkempt look was the unlikely breakout look from the campaignand eventually even made its way onto Paris runways. Hillary took the normally drab pantsuit and turned it into one of the most iconic looks in recent memory. What do you think?

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Which look is more iconic—Hillary's pantsuits or Bernie's frumpiness?
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Bernie got a lot of shit for not really caring about how he looks. More often than not, his suits were too big, his hair was a mess and his shirts rumpled. But if you pay attention, the man knows what he's doing. 

Sanders’s accent may be all barbaric New Yawk yawp, but his fashion sense reflects the place he’s spent most of his career: New England, the land of Merrells and L.L. Bean. Just like anywhere else, people there jockey for sartorial status, but it’s subtle: Fashion cred is centered around things like waterproofing and frostbite protection.

If fashion is about artistic personal expression, then Bernie has it nailed down. He doesn't need to be cool. He doesn't need to dress to impress. He knows exactly who he is and what he's about. Bernie's fashion is about substance—he wears things that simply work because that's the kind of person he is. 

His no-nonsense style reflects that kind of straight-shooter image: He’s not trying to tailor himself to a particular demographic — in fact, as a fashion editor would tell you, he’s not doing much tailoring of any kind. And his cool fan base appreciates the fact that he’s flagrantly uncool. There’s something comforting about that, for people our age — the fact that he looks like your dad (or your granddad) who’s here to set things right, down to the Men’s Wearhouse wardrobe (or would Bernie be more of a Syms customer?) Who better to salve scared, alienated young people than a member of the Silent Generation who was normcore before normcore?
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But don't mistake his normcore tendencies for laziness. Bernie's normcore fashion took to the runways in Paris with Balenciaga's Fall-Winter 2017 collection

Balenciaga designer Demna Gvasalia lifted Bernie's campaign logo for his Fall-Winter 2017 show and cleverly used it as the brand's own on T-shirts and scarves and bomber jackets. The collection was inspired by corporate dressing, which meant a lot of ugly-cool versions of suits (perhaps you remember his comically oversize, Talking Heads–esque jackets from last season) and lots of corporate logos, including that of the luxury conglomerate Kering, which happens to own Balenciaga. But the Bernie logos had everyone talking (and tweeting, and ’gramming).
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Hillary's outfits reflect her personality and campaign—she's bold and ready to make a statement. She's here for business but she's also going to look good doing it. Hillary knows what she's doing. 

“If you look at a lot of [Clinton’s] fashion choices, you know, they’re fashion choices,” the Instagrammer told Vanity Fair in a phone interview “They’re not like, suburban mom choices.” In other words, they don’t come from a prescribed uniform—they’re conscious gestures that use color and silhouette to telegraph femininity, authority, glamour, poise, or some mixture therein. (When looking at a selection of Clinton’s outfits in this way, her clothing, in fact, often conveys some of the exact qualities—a sense of fun and a warmth that comes from an empathetic spirit—that her campaign has openly admitted it has struggled to convey.)

Annie Linksey at the Boston Globe spoke with experts who had this to say:

“There is a different formula this time around,” said Lauren A. Rothman, a Washington-based stylist and author of “Style Bible,” a book about dressing for work. “Her silhouette has changed. It is more flattering. It is more modern. . . . You may never want to dress like her but she has style.”
“The aesthetic is clean, very polished,” said Corey Roche, a Los Angeles-based celebrity stylist. “It has evolved and into a good place. When you go back to when Bill was in office she was all over the place.”
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And much like Bernie, Hillary's fashion trickled down to the runway as well. 

The Democratic presidential nominee is, by no means, the typical fashion icon, not in the manner of an actress, a musician or even First Lady Michelle Obama. But it is hard to deny her influence, whether direct or indirect — on so many designers. The historic nature of her campaign is in the air; and much of Seventh Avenue has been quite clear about supporting her. Just before fashion week began, more than a dozen designers participated in a runway show-fundraiser for Clinton, that was co-hosted by Vogue’s Anna Wintour. Later in the week, as performer Rufus Wainwright was serenading guests at the Michael Kors show, he paused to declare: “I’m with her.”
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FINAL RESULTS
Culture
Which look is more iconic—Hillary's pantsuits or Bernie's frumpiness?
#BernTheRunway
A festive crown for the winner
#PantsuitNationFTW