Kettle-cooked vs. regular potato chips: Which is better? | The Tylt

Kettle-cooked vs. regular potato chips: Which is better?

The cooking process is what separates kettle chips from traditional potato chips. Kettle chips are cooked in batches and take longer to crisp. The result is a thicker, motley batch of chips, which some argue carry a superior taste to regular potato chips. But traditionalists stay true to the age-old days of Lay's—the thin, crisp, and uniform potato chip is all you need. Which is the better chip?

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When it comes to the difference between these two types of chips, HuffPost's Amanda Schupak refers to nutritionist and author, JJ Virgin. According to Virgin, your classic "bagged chip" is fried on a conveyer belt, whereas kettle chips are cooked in batches. Virgin explains:

When a new batch of potatoes is added, it lowers the temperature of the oil, which means the chips take longer to cook, which results in their irregular shape, darkened parts and thicker texture.

Per Virgin's explanation, kettle chips are heartier than traditional potato chips, which are nothing more than flimsy potato disks. Kettle-cooked chips have personality, flavor, and texture, making them the superior choice. 

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Some argue that kettle chips also carry flavor better than their frail cousins. Barbecue kettle-cooked chips are one of the greatest things to grace a party platter, while barbecue potato chips are just slightly better than the original, disappointing variety.

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Blasphemy! Classic potato chips are the way to go. Name one important event in your life where normal potato chips were not present—the Super Bowl, your last birthday party, your lunch last week—regular potato chips improve any setting any time of the year.

According to ThoughtCo's Mary Bellis, the legend behind the potato chip had its start in the1800s thanks to George Crum:

During his shift, a disgruntled customer kept sending back an order of french fries, complaining that they were too thick. Frustrated, Crum prepared a new batch using potatoes that were sliced paper thin and fried to a crisp. Surprisingly, the customer, who happened to be railroad tycoon Cornelius Vanderbilt, loved it.
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With over one-fourth of the potato chip market under its belt, Lay's continues to make an impact by letting its own customers decide its next chip flavor. Kettle-cooked brands have not been so generous.

Lays offers everything from caesar salad to cappuccino flavors. Regular potato chips get points for innovation and creativity. 

FINAL RESULTS
Culture
Kettle-cooked vs. regular potato chips: Which is better?
A festive crown for the winner
#TeamKettleChips
#RegPotatoChipsFTW